Equity – 2 understand it all at best

Equity

There are, at least, two ways to discuss equity:

  • Equity is the residual interest in the assets of the entity after deducting all its liabilities, or
  • An equity instrument is any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of an entity after deducting all of its liabilities.

But also:

1. Equity the residual interest in the assets of the entity after deducting all its liabilities

1. Statement of Financial Position

Assets

Equity and liabilities

1. Non-current assets

2. Current assets

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A – TOTAL ASSETS [1 + 2] = B

3. Non-current liabilities (including Provisions)

4. Current liabilities (including Provisions)

5. Equity [1 + 2 -/- 3 -/- 4]

Help

B – TOTAL EQUITY AND LIABILITIES [3 + 4 + 5] = A

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Example Disclosure financial instruments

Example Disclosure financial instruments

The guidance for this example disclosure financial instruments is found here.

7 Financial assets and financial liabilities

This note provides information about the group’s financial instruments, including:

  • an overview of all financial instruments held by the group
  • specific information about each type of financial instrument
  • accounting policies
  • information about determining the fair value of the instruments, including judgements and estimation uncertainty involved.

The group holds the following financial instruments: [IFRS 7.8]

Amounts in CU’000

Notes

2020

2019

Financial assets

Financial assets at amortised cost

– Trade receivables

7(a)

15,662

8,220

– Other financial assets at amortised cost

7(b)

4,598

3,471

– Cash and cash equivalents

7(e)

55,083

30,299

Financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI)

7(c)

6,782

7,148

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (FVPL)

7(d)

13,690

11,895

Derivative financial instruments

– Used for hedging

12(a)

2,162

2,129

97,975

63,162

Example Disclosure financial instruments

Financial liabilities

Liabilities at amortised cost

– Trade and other payables1

7(f)

13,700

10,281

– Borrowings

7(g)

97,515

84,595

– Lease liabilities

8(b)

11,501

11,291

Derivative financial instruments

– Used for hedging

12(a)

766

777

Held for trading at FVPL

12(a)

610

621

124,092

107,565

The group’s exposure to various risks associated with the financial instruments is discussed in note 12. The maximum exposure to credit risk at the end of the reporting period is the carrying amount of each class of financial assets mentioned above. [IFRS 7.36(a), IFRS 7.31, IFRS 7.34(c)]

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Realised cash flows differ from expectations

Realised cash flows differ from expectationsRealised cash flows differ from expectations – The is forward-looking, so cash flows may sometimes be realised in a way that differs in a way that differs from the entity’s expectations at the time of the original assessment.

For example, the entity … Read more

Accounting policies for financial instruments

Accounting policies for financial instruments – a quite complete overview of all kinds of accounting issues for financial instruments such as measurement categories, initial recognition, amortised costs and effective interest rate, financial assets, impairment, derecognition, financial liabilities, derecognition, and derivatives. Enjoy it!

Summary of significant financial instruments accounting policies

1 Financial assets and liabilities

1.1 Summary of measurement categories

The insurer classifies its financial assets into the following categories:

Business model and cash flow characteristics

Type of financial instruments

Classification

Hold to collect business model and solely payments of principal and interest

Cash and cash equivalents

Amortised cost (AC)

Hold to collect and sell business model and solely payments of principal and interest

Government bonds

Fair value through other

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1 Strong Read Determination of separable assets

Determination of separable assetsDetermination of separable assets

– Businesses are created to bring together diverse resources and generate synergies that will be realised in jointly produced cash flows. While businesses typically acquire assets separately, they realise benefits from them jointly. If no synergies were anticipated, there would be no point in bringing resources together in the first place. As a result, combinations of resources where synergies are believed to exist typically command a higher price when sold jointly than they would when sold separately. This creates a problem for example for the fair value and realisable value bases, which typically look at the amounts that could be realised from the disposal of separable assets.

Consider the case of an item of … Read more

IFRS 9 ECL Model best read – Impairment of investments and loans

Impairment of investments and loans

is about impairment in a ‘normal’ business not complicated accounting but straightforward accounting calculations.

Normal operations

Although the focus for IFRS 9 Financial Instruments is on financial institutions such as banks and insurance companies, ‘normal’ operating entities are also affected by IFRS 9. Maybe their investment and loan portfolios are less complex but in operating a business and as part of the internal credit risk management practice policy making it is still important to implement the impairment model under IFRS 9 Financial Instruments.

The objective of these approaches to expected credit losses or timely recording of impairments/loss allowances is to provide approaches that result in a situation in which very different reporting entities all … Read more

Expected credit losses on financial assets

Expected credit losses on financial assets relates to the impairment requirements that are applied to:

Note 1 Cash and cash equivalents

Definition of cash and cash equivalents

IAS 7.6 includes the following definitions:

Cash’:

  • Cash on hand (physical currency held), and
  • Demand deposits.

Cash equivalents’:

  • Short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

IAS 7.7 then notes that cash equivalents are held for the purpose of meeting short term cash commitments rather than for investment or other purposes. IAS 7.7 also notes that:

‘…an investment normally qualifies as a cash equivalent only when it has a short maturity of, say, three months or less from the date of acquisition.’

Demand deposits

Demand deposits are not defined in IFRS. However, in order to qualify as cash, the related balance needs to have the same liquidity as cash itself, and so funds on ‘demand deposit’ need to be capable of being withdrawn at any time without penalty.

In general, deposits which can be withdrawn without penalty within 24 hours, or one working day, are regarded as being demand deposits. These include amounts deposited at financial institutions (such as funds in a bank current account), and may extend to cover deposits at non-financial institutions such as legal advisers, if funds are held for client in separate and designated accounts that can be called upon by the client at any time.

If a deposit does not qualify to be regarded as cash, it may qualify to be classified as a cash equivalent.

Consider this!

Questions arise about whether investments that can be withdrawn on demand (e.g. money market funds) could qualify to be regarded as cash equivalents.

In general, this is possible, but only in very limited circumstances.

This is because, in addition to the existence of the demand feature, all of the other requirements of IAS 7 need to be met. An interest bearing deposit at a financial institution might result in the amount of cash that would be received being known, and there might be an insignificant risk of changes in value (in particular in the current low interest rate environment), even if there is an early withdrawal penalty.

However, it is also necessary for it to be demonstrated that the investment is being held for the purpose of meeting short-term cash commitments rather than for investment or other purposes (IAS 7.7).

It may be difficult to reconcile this last requirement to the characteristics of the investment, particularly as its maturity (excluding the demand feature) increases.

Short term maturity

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What Is Fintech reporting IFRS 15

What Is Fintech or Financial Technology And Its Benefits?

New and fast-growing technologies like Financial Technology or Fintech have the potential benefits to collect and process data in real-time. This transforms how all businesses are working, how products and services are creating in the new economy, and how customers are engaging in this process. Every professional and commercial industry is affecting due by this change in workflows and business processes. The financial and economic sector is no exception.

Financial Technology or Fintech?

Fintech, short for Financial Technology, is a growing field and is now an economic revolution by the tech-savvy. It is the development of new technology to transform traditional institutions such as banks and insurance companies by uplift how they handle their finances and economic services. The process is not only digitizing money but also monetizing data to fit into the digitized world.

FinTech solutions have huge potential benefits for all businesses, especially new and existing small businesses. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are essential for economic maturity and employment. However, others may find it difficult to get the financing they need to survive and thrive.

Example

Automated drafting of portfolio management commentaries – Analytics & Reporting (October 2018, Societe Generale Securities Services)

Addventa Fintech exclusive partnership for automated drafting of portfolio management commentaries based on artificial intelligence solutions.

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