Separate lease and non-lease components for real estate under IFRS 16

Separate lease and non-lease components

Many real estate leases contain multiple lease and non-lease components, which landlords need to identify and account for separately.

1 Overview

IFRS 16 requires a landlord to separate the lease and non-lease components of a contract. (IFRS 16.12, IFRS 16.BC135(b))

In practice, real estate contracts may contain:

  • one or more lease components: e.g. the right to use land and/or a building; and
  • one or more non-lease components: e.g. maintenance, cleaning and provision of utilities.

For lessors, identifying components and allocating consideration will determine the split of lease income vs revenue from contracts with customers. These amounts are often presented and have to be disclosed separately. For example, a real estate company will need to distinguish lease income from revenue for other property related services – e.g. common area maintenance (CAM). (IFRS 15.110, IFRS 15.114, IFRS 16.90)

The key steps in accounting for the components of a contract are as follows.

Identify separate lease components (go here)

Identify non-lease components (go here)

Allocate consideration (go here)

Reallocate consideration on lease modification (go here)

2 Typical lease components in real estate contracts

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Landlord Lease term – IFRS 16 Best complete read

Landlord Lease term

New guidance on lease term could impact the period over which operating lease incentives are recognised in profit or loss, particularly for renewable and cancellable leases.

1 Overview of landlord lease term

Determining the lease term is a critical estimate that is significant for the lessor. The lease term may affect the lease classification. For operating leases, it impacts the period over which lease incentives are recognised.

The lease term is the non-cancellable period of the lease, together with:

  • optional renewable periods if the lessee is reasonably certain to extend; and
  • periods after an optional termination date if the lessee is reasonably certain not to terminate early. (IFRS 16.18)

To determine the lease term, a lessor first determines the length of the non-cancellable period of a lease and the period for which the contract is enforceable. It can then determine – between those two limits – the length of the lease term.

The lessor determines the lease term at the commencement date.

The lease term starts when the lessor makes the underlying asset available for use by the lessee. It includes any rent-free periods. (IFRS 16 Definition, IFRS 16.B36)

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Landlord accounting model – IFRS 16 best replacement for IAS 40

Landlord accounting model

Landlords continue to classify leases as finance or operating leases, and continue to classify many real estate leases as operating leases.

1 Overview

The lessor follows a dual accounting approach for lease accounting. The accounting is based on whether significant risks and rewards incidental to ownership of an underlying asset are transferred to the lessee, in which case the lease is classified as a finance lease. This is similar to the previous lease accounting requirements that applied to lessors.

What are the impacts of IFRS 16 on lessors?

Much of the guidance in IFRS 16 on lessor accounting is a ‘carry forward’ from IAS 17 Leases – literally a cut-and-paste. This reflects feedback from financial statement users and other stakeholders that lessor accounting was not ‘broken’.

However, there are a number of changes in the details of lessor accounting. For example, lessors apply the new:

  • definition of a lease (see this page);
  • guidance on separating components of a contract (see this page);
  • guidance on lease term (see this page);
  • guidance on lease modifications (see this page);
  • guidance on sub-lease (see this page); and
  • guidance on sale-and-leaseback (see this page).

The same definition of ‘lease term’ applies to both lessees and lessors. IFRS 16 includes guidance on when extension options and termination options are taken into consideration when determining the lease term. Additional guidance has been issued about determining the lease term – an estimate that could significantly impact the overall lease accounting.

In addition, IFRS 16 includes specific guidance on separating the components of a contract and accounting for lease modifications by lessors.

The new guidance may significantly impact the accounting for sub-leases and sale-and-leaseback transactions.

2 Lease classification

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Measurement of investment property

Measurement of investment property

Introduction

Control of real estate can be obtained through:

  • direct acquisition of real estate;
  • construction of real estate; or
  • leasing of real estate, under either operating or finance leases.

Entities normally perform strategic planning before the acquisition, construction or leasing, to assess the feasibility of the project.

Entities might incur costs attributable to the acquisition, construction or leasing of real estate, during this first step of the cycle. Entities might also enter into financing arrangements to secure the liquidity required for the acquisition and construction of real estate.

The direct acquisition of investment property is presented here and the lease of investment property is presented here (Landlord lease accounting).

In this narrative the investment properties under construction (i.e. initial recognition of the development of real estate) and subsequent measurement of investment properties are handled.

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Acquisition of investment properties – How 2 best account it

Acquisition of investment properties

– When should a purchase of investment property (or properties) be accounted for as a business combination, and when as a simple asset purchase? This is an important issue because the IFRS accounting requirements for a business combination are very different from asset purchases.

Asset acquisition or business combination

The IASB’s new guidance changes the definition of a business and will likely result in more transactions being recorded as asset acquisitions. The new definition of a business could have a significant impact in the real estate (RE) industry.

New guidance (from 1 January 2020 or earlier)

IFRS 3 ‘Business Combinations’ has been amended to update the definition of a business. The new model introduces an optional concentration test that, if met, eliminates the need for further assessment. To be considered a business, an acquisition would have to include an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create outputs. The new guidance provides a framework to evaluate when an input and a substantive process are present.

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Capitalisation of expenditure – 1 Complete answer

Capitalisation of expenditure

Capitalisation of expenditure is only possible when one of the following situations occur:

  • Capital expenditure (including equipment repairs and maintenance)
  • Recording lease contracts – Right-of-Use Assets
  • Capitalisation of borrowing costs
  • Capitalisation of cloud computing costs
  • Capitalisation of intangible assets
  • Capitalisation of internally capitalized intangible assets
  • Research & development costs
  • Prepaid expenses

Capital expenditure (including equipment repairs and maintenance)

The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment under IAS 16 Property, plant and equipment shall be recognised as an asset if, and only if:

  • it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the entity; and
  • the cost of the item can be measured reliably. (IAS 16.7)

Investment property

Certain properties which are used on rental are classified as an investment property in which case IAS 40 Investment property will apply. Only tangible items which have a useful life of more than one period are classified as property, plant and equipment as per IAS 16. But refer to the words “more than one period” as more than one accounting period of 12 months.

Also, an entity shall determine a threshold limit commensurate to its size for recognizing a tangible item as property, plant and equipment. For example, a tangible item of insignificant amount although satisfying the definition of property, plant and equipment may be expensed.

Initial recognition of indirect costs

Items of property, plant and equipment may be acquired for safety or environmental reasons. The acquisition of such property plant and equipment, although not directly increasing the future economic benefits of any particular existing item of property, plant and equipment, may be necessary for an entity to obtain the future economic benefits from its other assets.

Such items of property plant and equipment qualify for recognition as assets because they enable an entity to derive future economic benefits from related assets in excess of what could be derived had those items not been acquired.

Subsequent recognition of indirect costs

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Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15 Complete and Exemplary Read

Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Barter transactions are the exchange of goods or services, in exchange for other goods or services

IFRS References: IFRS 15, IAS 16, IAS 38, IAS 40 Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

If an entity enters into a non-monetary exchange with a customer as part of its ordinary activities, then generally it applies the guidance on non-cash consideration in the IFRS 15 Revenue standard. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Non-monetary exchanges with non-customers do not give rise to revenue. If a non-monetary exchange of assets with a non-customer has commercial substance, then the transaction gives rise to a gain or loss. The cost of the asset acquired is generally the fair value of the asset surrendered, adjusted for any cash transferred. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Simple bartering involves no cost as this involves exchanging goods and/or services of the same value.

A barter exchange operates as a broker and bank in which each participating member has an account that is debited when purchasesNon-monetary transactions IFRS 15 are made, and credited when sales are made. Compared to one-to-one bartering, concerns over unequal exchanges are reduced in a barter exchange.

The exchange plays an important role because it provides the record-keeping, brokering expertise and monthly statements to each member. Commercial exchanges make money by charging a commission on each transaction on either the buy or sell side, or a combination of both. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

In general, one requirement remains in tact in non-monetary transactions, revenue cannot be recognised if the amount of revenue is not reliably measurable. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

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9 Best basic investment or owner-occupied property

9 Best basic investment or owner-occupied property starts with the two definitions: 9 Best basic investment or owner-occupied property

  1. Investment property is property (land or a building or part of a building or both) held (by the owner or by the lessee under a finance lease) to earn rentals or for capital appreciation or both.
  2. Owner-occupied property is property held (by the owner or by the lessee under a finance lease) for use in the production or supply of goods or services or for administrative purposes.

1 Property held under an operating lease

A property interest that is held by a lessee under an operating lease may be classified and accounted for as investment property if, and only if, … Read more