1 THE OBJECTIVE OF GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL REPORTING

Introduction

1.1 The objective of general purpose financial reporting forms the foundation of the Conceptual Framework. Other aspects of the Conceptual Framework—the qualitative characteristics of, and the cost constraint on, useful financial information, a reporting entity concept, elements of financial statements, recognition and derecognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure—flow logically from the objective.

Objective, usefulness and limitations of general purpose financial reporting

1.2 The objective of general purpose financial reporting is to provide financial information Continue reading

2 QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF USEFUL FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Introduction

2.1 The qualitative characteristics of useful financial information discussed in this chapter identify the types of information that are likely to be most useful to the existing and potential investors, lenders and other creditors for making decisions about the reporting entity on the basis of information in its financial report (financial information).

2.2 Financial reports provide information about the reporting entity’s economic resources, claims against the reporting entity and the effects of transactions and other events and conditions that Continue reading

3 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND THE REPORTING ENTITY

Financial statements

3.1 Chapters 1 and 2 discuss information provided in general purpose financial reports and Chapters 3–8 discuss information provided in general purpose financial statements, which are a particular form of general purpose financial reports. Financial statements provide information about economic resources of the reporting entity, claims against the entity, and changes in those resources and claims, that meet the definitions of the elements of financial statements (see Table 4.1).

Objective and scope of financial statements

3.2 Continue reading

4 THE ELEMENTS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Introduction

4.1 The elements of financial statements defined in the Conceptual Framework are:

  1. assets, liabilities and equity, which relate to a reporting entity’s financial position; and
  2. income and expenses, which relate to a reporting entity’s financial performance.

4.2 Those elements are linked to the economic resources, claims and changes in economic resources and claims discussed in Chapter 1, and are defined in Table 4.1.

Table 4.1The elements of financial statements

Definition of an assetContinue reading

5 RECOGNITION AND DERECOGNITION

The recognition process

5.1 Recognition is the process of capturing for inclusion in the statement of financial position or the statement(s) of financial performance an item that meets the definition of one of the elements of financial statements—an asset, a liability, equity, income or expenses. Recognition involves depicting the item in one of those statements—either alone or in aggregation with other items—in words and by a monetary amount, and including that amount in one or more totals in Continue reading

6 MEASUREMENT

Introduction

6.1 Elements recognised in financial statements are quantified in monetary terms. This requires the selection of a measurement basis. A measurement basis is an identified feature—for example, historical cost, fair value or fulfilment value—of an item being measured. Applying a measurement basis to an asset or liability creates a measure for that asset or liability and for related income and expenses.

6.2 Consideration of the qualitative characteristics of useful financial information and of the cost Continue reading

7 PRESENTATION AND DISCLOSURE

Presentation and disclosure as communication tools

7.1 A reporting entity communicates information about its assets, liabilities, equity, income and expenses by presenting and disclosing information in its financial statements.

7.2 Effective communication of information in financial statements makes that information more relevant and contributes to a faithful representation of an entity’s assets, liabilities, equity, income and expenses. It also enhances the understandability and comparability of information in financial statements. Effective communication of information in financial statements requires:

  1. focusing on
Continue reading

8 CONCEPTS OF CAPITAL AND CAPITAL MAINTENANCE

Concepts of capital

8.1 A financial concept of capital is adopted by most entities in preparing their financial statements. Under a financial concept of capital, such as invested money or invested purchasing power, capital is synonymous with the net assets or equity of the entity. Under a physical concept of capital, such as operating capability, capital is regarded as the productive capacity of the entity based on, for example, units of output per day.

8.2 The selection of the Continue reading