IFRS Standard: IAS 36 Impairment of assets

The objective of this Standard is to prescribe the procedures that an entity
applies to ensure that its assets are carried at no more than their recoverable
amount. An asset is carried at more than its recoverable amount if its carrying
amount exceeds the amount to be recovered through use or sale of the asset. If
this is the case, the asset is described as impaired and the Standard requires the
entity to recognise an impairment loss. The Standard also specifies when an
entity should reverse an impairment loss and prescribes dis

IAS 36 Objective Scope Definitions

Objective

1 The objective of this Standard is to prescribe the procedures that an entity applies to ensure that its assets are carried at no more than their recoverable amount. An asset is carried at more than its recoverable amount if its carrying amount exceeds the amount to be recovered through use or sale of the asset. If this is the case, the asset is described as impaired and the Standard requires the entity to recognise an impairment loss. The Standard also specifies when an entity should reverse an impairment loss and prescribes disclosures.

Scope

2 This Standard shall be applied in accounting for the impairment of all assets, other than:

  1. inventories (see IAS 2 Inventories);
  2. contract assets
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IAS 36 Identify an impaired asset

Identifying an asset that may be impaired

7 Paragraphs 8–17 specify when recoverable amount shall be determined. These requirements use the term ‘an asset’ but apply equally to an individual asset or a cash-generating unit. The remainder of this Standard is structured as follows:

  1. paragraphs 18–57 set out the requirements for measuring recoverable amount. These requirements also use the term ‘an asset’ but apply equally to an individual asset and a cash-generating unit.
  2. paragraphs 58–108 set out the requirements for recognising and measuring impairment losses. Recognition and measurement of impairment losses for individual assets other than goodwill are dealt with in paragraphs 58–64. Paragraphs 65–108 deal with the recognition and measurement of impairment losses for cash-generating units and goodwill.
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IAS 36 Measuring recoverable amount

18 This Standard defines recoverable amount as the higher of an asset’s or cash-generating unit’s fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Paragraphs 19–57 set out the requirements for measuring recoverable amount. These requirements use the term ‘an asset’ but apply equally to an individual asset or a cash-generating unit.

19 It is not always necessary to determine both an asset’s fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. If either of these amounts exceeds the asset’s carrying amount, the asset is not impaired and it is not necessary to estimate the other amount.

20 It may be possible to measure fair value less costs of disposal, even if there is Read more

IAS 36 Recognising and measuring an impairment loss

58 Paragraphs 59–64 set out the requirements for recognising and measuring impairment losses for an individual asset other than goodwill. Recognising and measuring impairment losses for cash-generating units and goodwill are dealt with in paragraphs 65–108.

59 If, and only if, the recoverable amount of an asset is less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset shall be reduced to its recoverable amount. That reduction is an impairment loss.

60 An impairment loss shall be recognised immediately in profit or loss, unless the asset is carried at revalued amount in accordance with another Standard (for example, in accordance with the revaluation model in IAS 16). Any impairment loss of a revalued asset shall be treated Read more

IAS 36 Cash-generating units and goodwill

65 Paragraphs 66–108 and Appendix C set out the requirements for identifying the cash-generating unit to which an asset belongs and determining the carrying amount of, and recognising impairment losses for, cash-generating units and goodwill.

Identifying the cash-generating unit to which an asset belongs

66 If there is any indication that an asset may be impaired, recoverable amount shall be estimated for the individual asset. If it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of the individual asset, an entity shall determine the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs (the asset’s cash-generating unit).

67 The recoverable amount of an individual asset cannot be determined if:

  1. the asset’s value in use cannot be estimated
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IAS 36 Reversing an impairment loss

109 Paragraphs 110–116 set out the requirements for reversing an impairment loss recognised for an asset or a cash-generating unit in prior periods. These requirements use the term ‘an asset’ but apply equally to an individual asset or a cash-generating unit. Additional requirements for an individual asset are set out in paragraphs 117–121, for a cash-generating unit in paragraphs 122 and 123 and for goodwill in paragraphs 124 and 125.

110 An entity shall assess at the end of each reporting period whether there is any indication that an impairment loss recognised in prior periods for an asset other than goodwill may no longer exist or may have decreased. If any such indication exists, the entity shall estimate the Read more

IAS 36 Disclosure

126 An entity shall disclose the following for each class of assets:

  1. the amount of impairment losses recognised in profit or loss during the period and the line item(s) of the statement of comprehensive income in which those impairment losses are included.
  2. the amount of reversals of impairment losses recognised in profit or loss during the period and the line item(s) of the statement of comprehensive income in which those impairment losses are reversed.
  3. the amount of impairment losses on revalued assets recognised in other comprehensive income during the period.
  4. the amount of reversals of impairment losses on revalued assets recognised in other comprehensive income during the period.

127 A class of assets is a grouping of assets of similar Read more

IAS 36 App A Present value as Value in use

Appendix A

Using present value techniques to measure value in use

This appendix is an integral part of the Standard. It provides guidance on the use of present value techniques in measuring value in use. Although the guidance uses the term ‘asset’, it equally applies to a group of assets forming a cash-generating unit.

The components of a present value measurement

A1 The following elements together capture the economic differences between assets:

  1. an estimate of the future cash flow, or in more complex cases, series of future cash flows the entity expects to derive from the asset;
  2. expectations about possible variations in the amount or timing of those cash flows;
  3. the time value of money, represented by
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IAS 36 App C Impairment testing CGU Goodwill NCI

Appendix C

Impairment testing cash-generating units with goodwill and non-controlling interests

This appendix is an integral part of the Standard.

C1 In accordance with IFRS 3 (as revised in 2008), the acquirer measures and recognises goodwill as of the acquisition date as the excess of (a) over (b) below:

  1. the aggregate of:
    1. the consideration transferred measured in accordance with IFRS 3, which generally requires acquisition-date fair value;
    2. the amount of any non-controlling interest in the acquiree measured in accordance with IFRS 3; and
    3. in a business combination achieved in stages, the acquisition-date fair value of the acquirer’s previously held equity interest in the acquiree.
  2. the net of the acquisition-date amounts of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed
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IAS 36IE Identification of cash-generating units

Illustrative examples

These examples accompany, but are not part of, IAS 36. All the examples assume that the entities concerned have no transactions other than those described. In the examples monetary amounts are denominated in ‘currency units (CU)’.

Example 1 Identification of cash-generating units

The purpose of this example is:

  1. to indicate how cash-generating units are identified in various situations; and
  2. to highlight certain factors that an entity may consider in identifying the cash-generating unit to which an asset belongs.

A Retail store chain

Background

IE1 Store X belongs to a retail store chain M. X makes all its retail purchases through M’s purchasing centre. Pricing, marketing, advertising and human resources policies (except for hiring X’s cashiers and sales Read more