IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct

IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with CustomersIFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct

IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct

Examples 10–12 illustrate the requirements in paragraphs 22–30 of IFRS 15 on identifying performance obligations.

Example 10—Goods and services are not distinct

Case A – Significant integration service

IE45 An entity, a contractor, enters into a contract to build a hospital for a customer. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, piping and wiring, installation of equipment and finishing.

IE46 The promised goods and services are capable of being distinct in accordance with paragraph 27(a) of IFRS 15. That is, the customer can benefit from the goods and services either on their own or together with other readily available resources. This is evidenced by the fact that the entity, or competitors of the entity, regularly sells many of these goods and services separately to other customers. In addition, the customer could generate economic benefit from the individual goods and services by using, consuming, selling or holding those goods or services.

IE47 However, the goods and services are not distinct within the context of the contract in accordance with paragraph 27(b) of IFRS 15 (on the basis of the factors in paragraph 29 of IFRS 15). That is, the entity’s promise to transfer individual goods and services in the contract are not separately identifiable from other promises in the contract. This is evidenced by the fact that the entity provides a significant service of integrating the goods and services (the inputs) into the hospital (the combined output) for which the customer has contracted.

IE48 Because both criteria in paragraph 27 of IFRS 15 are not met, the goods and services are not distinct. The entity accounts for all of the goods and services in the contract as a single performance obligation.

Case B – Significant integration services

IE48A An entity enters into a contract with a customer that will result in the delivery of multiple units of a highly complex, specialised device. The terms of the contract require the entity to establish a manufacturing process in order to produce the contracted units. The specifications are unique to the customer, based on a custom design that is owned by the customer and that were developed under the terms of a separate contract that is not part of the current negotiated exchange. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the contract, which requires the performance and integration of various activities including procurement of materials, identifying and managing subcontractors, and performing manufacturing, assembly and testing.

IE48B The entity assesses the promises in the contract and determines that each of the promised devices is capable of being distinct in accordance with paragraph 27(a) of IFRS 15 because the customer can benefit from each device on its own. This is because each unit can function independently of the other units.

IE48C The entity observes that the nature of its promise is to establish and provide a service of producing the full complement of devices for which the customer has contracted in accordance with the customer’s specifications. The entity considers that it is responsible for overall management of the contract and for providing a significant service of integrating various goods and services (the inputs) into its overall service and the resulting devices (the combined output) and, therefore, the devices and the various promised goods and services inherent in producing those devices are not separately identifiable in accordance with paragraph 27(b) and paragraph 29 of IFRS 15. In this case, the manufacturing process provided by the entity is specific to its contract with the customer. In addition, the nature of the entity’s performance and, in particular, the significant integration service of the various activities means that a change in one of the entity’s activities to produce the devices has a significant effect on the other activities required to produce the highly complex, specialised devices such that the entity’s activities are highly interdependent and highly interrelated. Because the criterion in paragraph 27(b) of IFRS 15 is not met, the goods and services that will be provided by the entity are not separately identifiable and, therefore, are not distinct. The entity accounts for all of the goods and services promised in the contract as a single performance obligation.

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IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct IFRS 15 Goods and services are not distinct

An entity, a contractor, enters into a contract to build a hospital for a customer. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, piping and wiring, installation of equipment and finishing.

An entity, a contractor, enters into a contract to build a hospital for a customer. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, piping and wiring, installation of equipment and finishing.

An entity, a contractor, enters into a contract to build a hospital for a customer. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, piping and wiring, installation of equipment and finishing.

An entity, a contractor, enters into a contract to build a hospital for a customer. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, piping and wiring, installation of equipment and finishing.

An entity, a contractor, enters into a contract to build a hospital for a customer. The entity is responsible for the overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, piping and wiring, installation of equipment and finishing.