Measuring goodwill or a gain from a bargain purchase

Measuring the acquisition-date fair value of the acquirer’s interest in the acquiree using valuation techniques

In a business combination achieved without the transfer of consideration, the acquirer must substitute the acquisition-date fair value of its interest in the acquiree for the acquisition-date fair value of the consideration transferred to measure goodwill or a gain on a bargain purchase (see Goodwill or gain from a bargain).

Special considerations in applying the acquisition method to combinations of mutual entities

When two mutual entities combine, the fair value of the equity or member interests in the acquiree (or the fair value of the acquiree) may be more reliably measurable than the fair value of the member interests transferred by the acquirer. In that situation, Goodwill or a gain from a bargain purchase – Exchange of only equity interests in Goodwill or gain from a bargain requires the acquirer to determine the amount of goodwill by using the acquisition-date fair value of the acquiree’s equity interests instead of the acquisition-date fair value of the acquirer’s equity interests transferred as consideration. In addition, the acquirer in a combination of mutual entities shall recognise the acquiree’s net assets as a direct addition to capital or equity in its statement of financial position, not as an addition to retained earnings, which is consistent with the way in which other types of entities apply the acquisition method.

Although they are similar in many ways to other businesses, mutual entities have distinct characteristics that arise primarily because their members are both customers and owners. Members of mutual entities generally expect to receive benefits for their membership, often in the form of reduced fees charged for goods and services or patronage dividends. The portion of patronage dividends allocated to each member is often based on the amount of business the member did with the mutual entity during the year.

A fair value measurement of a mutual entity should include the assumptions that market participants would make about future member benefits as well as any other relevant assumptions market participants would make about the mutual entity. For example, a present value technique may be used to measure the fair value of a mutual entity. The cash flows used as inputs to the model should be based on the expected cash flows of the mutual entity, which are likely to reflect reductions for member benefits, such as reduced fees charged for goods and services.