Property plant and equipment Example

Property plant and equipment Example – Accounting policy example

Property plant and equipment is stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. The initial cost of an asset comprises its purchase price or construction cost, any costs directly attributable to bringing the asset into the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management, the initial estimate of any decommissioning obligation, if any, and, for assets that necessarily take a substantial period of time to get ready for their intended use, directly attributable finance costs.

The purchase price or construction cost is the aggregate amount paid and the fair value of any other consideration given to acquire the asset. The capitalized value of a lease is also included within property, plant and equipment. PropertRecurringy plant and equipment Example

Expenditure on major maintenance refits or repairs comprises the cost of replacement assets or parts of assets, inspection costs and overhaul costs. Where an asset or part of an asset that was separately depreciated is replaced and it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the group, the expenditure is capitalized and the carrying amount of the replaced asset is derecognized. Property plant and equipment Example

Inspection costs associated with major maintenance programmes are capitalized and amortized over the period to the next inspection. Overhaul costs for major maintenance programmes, and all other maintenance costs are expensed as incurred. Property plant and equipment Example

Oil and natural gas properties, including related pipelines, are depreciated using a unit-of-production method. The cost of producing wells is amortized over proved developed reserves. Licence acquisition, common facilities and future decommissioning costs are amortized over total proved reserves. The unit-of-production rate for the depreciation of common facilities takes into account expenditures incurred to date, together with estimated future capital expenditure expected to be incurred relating to as yet undeveloped reserves expected to be processed through these common facilities.

Something else -   What is the component approach?

Other property plant and equipment is depreciated on a straight-line basis over its expected useful life. The typical useful lives of the group’s other property, plant and equipment are as follows:

  • Land improvements 15 to 25 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Buildings 20 to 50 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Refineries 20 to 30 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Petrochemicals plants 20 to 30 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Pipelines 10 to 50 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Service stations 15 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Office equipment 3 to 7 years Property plant and equipment Example
  • Fixtures and fittings 5 to 15 years Property plant and equipment Example

The expected useful lives of property, plant and equipment are reviewed on an annual basis and, if necessary, changes in useful lives are accounted for prospectively.

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognized upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected to arise from the continued use of the asset. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset (calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the item) is included in the income statement in the period in which the item is derecognized.

Retrieved from BP Plc’;s Financial statements 2017

https://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/investors/results-and-reporting/annual-report.html

Property plant and equipment Example

See also: Cost of PPE

General model of measurement of insurance contracts

Property plant and equipment Example

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Something else -   Economic life

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