Need for accounting measurement the big 1

Need for accounting measurement

Need for accounting measurement provides a summary of the measurement bases in use in Financial Reporting
and the concepts behind these measurement bases.
The measurement bases that will be considered here are

All these bases are forms of accrual accounting – that is, they are intended to measure income as it is earned and costs as they are incurred, as opposed to simply recording cash flows. The last four are all forms of current value measurement.

In forming a judgment on the appropriateness of measurement bases, in literature, the overriding tests has been identified to be their cost-effectiveness and fitness for purpose. However, in the absence of direct evidence on these matters, it is usual to argue in terms of various secondary characteristics that ought to be relevant in assessing the quality of information (see the key indicators in What is useful information?).

The most important of these characteristics are generally considered to be relevance and faithful representation / reliability (older term).

For each basis, an outline is given of how it works and the relevance and faithful representation of the resulting measurements. The question of measurement costs is also considered briefly. In reading the analyses that follow, the following comments should be borne in mind.

Bases of measurement in financial reporting are not carved in stone. Different people have different views on how each basis should work, and meanings evolve as practice changes. Some readers may therefore find that the way a particular basis is described does not match how they understand it.

This does not mean either that their understanding is wrong or that the description in the report is wrong; views on these things simply differ.

Read more

Related IFRS posts

The Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting

The Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting  is to provide financial information about the reporting entity that is useful to existing and potential investors, lenders and other creditors in making decisions about providing resources to the entity. Those decisions involve buying, selling or holding equity and , and providing or settling loans and other forms of … Read more

Loss allowance

Loss allowance is an approach for the prudence or conservatism principle. Assets should not be overstated, liabilities not understated. Better save than sorry!

Software warranties

Software warranties - A customer may have the option to separately purchase a warranty on a product (e.g., computer hardware, equipment) for a period of time

Reclassification adjustments

With an increase in the use of fair value measurement in the financial position, there was a need to separate realised gains and losses from unrealised gains and loss. Realised gains and losses (using accrual accounting) are include in profit or loss. Unrealised gains and losses in other comprehensive income.

Realisation principle

The realisation principle is the concept that revenue can only be recognised once the underlying goods or services are delivered.

What are IFRS Financial Statements?

What are IFRS Financial Statements – The objective of financial statements is to provide financial information about the reporting entity’s assets, liabilities, equity, income and expenses that is useful to users of financial statements in assessing the prospects for future net cash inflows to the reporting entity and in assessing management’s stewardship of the entity’s economic resources.

A content page of IFRS Financial Statement may look similar to the following content listing: What are IFRS Financial Statements?

  • Statement of Financial Position: This is also known as the balance sheet. IFRS prescribes the ways in which the components of a balance sheet are reported. This statement recognises assets, liabilities and equity. This comprises information about a reporting entity’s economic resources,

Read more