The Statement of Cash Flows

A Historical Perspective on the Statement of Cash Flows

In 1987, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an accounting standard, FASB Statement no. 95, requiring that the statement of cash flows be presented as one of the three primary financial statements. Previously, companies had been required to present a statement of changes in financial position, often called the funds statement. In 1971, APC Opinion no. 19 made the funds statement a required financial statement although many companies had begun reporting funds flow information several years earlier.

The funds statement provided useful information, but it had several limitations. First, APB Opinion no. 19 allowed considerable flexibility in how funds could be defined and how they were reported on the Read more

Sales warranties

The Case: Example on recognising and measuring provisions  Sales warranties

A manufacturer gives warranties at the time of sale to purchasers of its product. Under the terms of the contract for sale, the manufacturer undertakes to make good, by repair or replacement, manufacturing defects that become apparent within three years from the date of sale. On the basis of experience, it is probable (ie more likely than not) that there will be some claims under the warranties.

Considerations Sales warranties

Present obligation as a result of a past obligating event—the obligating event is the sale of the product with a warranty, which gives rise to a legal obligation.

An outflow of resources embodying economic benefits in settlement—probable for … Read more

Business Combinations and Goodwill

Introduction Business Combinations and Goodwill

19.1 Business Combinations and Goodwill applies to accounting for business combinations. It provides guidance on identifying the acquirer, measuring the cost of the business combination and allocating that cost to the assets acquired and liabilities and provisions for contingent liabilities assumed. It also addresses accounting for goodwill both at the time of a business combination and subsequently.

Business Combinations and Goodwill – Exceptions

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Insurance modelling

The estimates of future cash flows should incorporate all reasonable and supportable information available without undue cost or effort about amount, timing and uncertainty of those future cash flows. To accomplish this, an entity should estimate the expected value of the full range of possible outcomes. Estimates and assumptions should be unbiased (that is, neither conservative nor optimistic).

The objective of considering the full range of all possible outcomes is to incorporate all reasonable and supportable information. An insurer is not required to identify every possible scenario. Explicit scenarios are not required if the result meets the objective. However, a single scenario based on the most likely outcome or the more-likely-than-not outcome would not meet the objective Read more

Measurement under IFRS

The standards for which the IASB is responsible – International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) – are one collection of financial reporting practices. They are increasingly important because of the growing number of companies around the world (especially listed companies) that are required to comply with them, and the growing number of countries – including the UK – that model their own more general financial reporting requirements on them.

IFRS incorporates and builds on the accumulated, often inconsistent practical solutions devised by national standard-setters to deal with financial reporting problems that have emerged over many years, solutions which are in turn built on the accumulated business practices of centuries. IFRS is not a completely new and uniform approach to financial reporting, Read more