Better Communication in Financial Reporting

Better Communication in Financial Reporting

Better Communication in Financial Reporting is an IFRS.org initiative to focus financial reporting on users. There is a general view that financial reports have become too complex and difficult to read and that financial reporting tends to focus more on compliance than communication. See also narrative reporting as a discussion on alternative ways of reporting.

At the same time, users’ tolerance for sifting through information to find what they need continues to decline.

This has implications for the reputation of companies who fail to keep pace. A global study confirmed this trend, with the majority of analysts stating that the quality of reporting directly influenced their opinion of the quality of management.

To demonstrate what companies could do to make their financial report more relevant, there are several suggestions to ‘streamline’ the financial statements to reflect some of the best practices that have been emerging globally over the past few years. In particular:

  • Information is organized to clearly tell the story of financial performance and make critical information more prominent and easier to find.
  • Additional information is included where it is important for an understanding of the performance of the company. For example, we have included a summary of significant transactions and events as the first note to the financial statements even though this is not a required disclosure.

Improving disclosure effectiveness

Terms such as ’disclosure overload’ and ‘cutting the clutter’, and more precisely ‘disclosure effectiveness’, describe a problem in financial reporting that has become a priority issue for the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB or Board), local standard setters, and regulatory bodies. The growth and complexity of financial statement disclosure is also drawing significant attention from financial statement preparers, and more importantly, the users of financial statements.

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1 Best Complete Read – Financial Instruments

Financial Instruments is a summary of the current (Financial Statements preparation for 2020 on wards) IFRS reporting requirements relating to the combination of IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation, IFRS 7 Financial instruments: Disclosure and IFRS 9 Financial Instruments, into one overall narrative.

IFRS standards for Financial Instruments have a complicated history. It was originally intended that IFRS 9 would replace IAS 39 in its entirety. However, in response to requests from interested parties that the accounting for financial instruments be improved quickly, the project to replace IAS 39 was divided into three main phases.

The three main phases of the project to replace IAS 39 were:

  1. Phase 1: classification and measurement of financial assets and financial liabilities.
  2. Phase
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The best 1 in overview – IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

forward-looking information to recognise expected credit losses for all debt-type financial assets

 

Under IFRS 9 Impairment requirements, recognition of impairment no longer depends on a reporting entity first identifying a credit loss event.

IFRS 9 instead uses more forward-looking information to recognise expected credit losses for all debt-type financial assets that are not measured at fair value through profit or loss.

IFRS 9 requires an entity to recognise a loss allowance for expected credit losses on:

  • debt instruments measured at amortised cost
  • debt instruments measured at fair value through other comprehensive income
  • lease receivables
  • contract assets (as defined in IFRS 15 ‘Revenue from Contracts with Customers’)
  • loan commitments that are not measured at fair value through profit or loss
  • financial guarantee contracts (except those accounted for as insurance contracts).

IFRS 9 requires an expected loss allowance to be estimated for each of these types of asset or exposure. However, the Standard specifies three different approaches depending on the type of asset or exposure:

IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

* optional application to trade receivables and contract assets with a significant financing component, and to lease receivables

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IAS 36 Best brilliant impairment of telecom assets

IAS 36 Best brilliant impairment of telecom assets sets out the procedures that an entity should follow to ensure that it carries its assets at no more than thIAS 36 Best brilliant impairment of telecom assetseir recoverable amount. Recoverable amount is the higher of the amount to be realised through using or selling the asset.

Where the carrying amount exceeds the recoverable amount, the asset is impaired and an impairment loss must be recognised.

The standard details the circumstances when an impairment loss should be reversed, and also sets out required disclosures for impaired assets, impairment losses, reversals of impairment losses as well as key estimates and assumptions used in measuring the recoverable amounts of cash-generating units (CGUs) that contain goodwill or intangible assets with indefinite … Read more

IFRS 7 Other price risks Step-by-step

IFRS 7 Other price risks Step-by-step – Other price risks is part of the risk disclosures requirements under IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures. Other price risks is part of market risk (the other main market risk categories being currency risk and interest rate risk) and is defined as the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices (other than those arising from interest rate risk or currency risk), whether those changes are caused by factors specific to the individual financial instrument or its issuer or by factors affecting all similar financial instruments traded in the market. IFRS 7 Other price risks Step-by-step

Management should disclose information … Read more

IFRS 7 Interest rate risk disclosure example

IFRS 7 Interest rate risk disclosure example – Interest rate risk is part of the risk disclosures requirements under IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures. Interest rate risk is part of market risk (the other market risks being currency risk and other price risk) and is defined as the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. IFRS 7 Interest rate risk disclosure example

Management should disclose information that enables users of its financial statements to evaluate the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments to which the entity is exposed at the end of the reporting period [IFRS 7 31]. The disclosures … Read more

IFRS 7 Complete Maturity analysis disclosure

IFRS 7 Complete Maturity analysis disclosure – IFRS 7 requires certain disclosures to be presented by category of an instrument based on the IFRS 9 recognition and measurement categories of financial instruments.

Certain other disclosures are required by class of financial instrument. For those disclosures an entity must group its financial instruments into classes of similar instruments as appropriate to the nature of the information presented. [IFRS 7 6]

The two main categories of disclosures required by IFRS 7 are:

  1. information about the significance of financial instruments [IFRS 7 7 – 30]
  2. information about the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments [IFRS 7 31 – 42]

So IFRS 7 bets … Read more

IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures

IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures – Management should disclose information that enables users of its financial statements to evaluate the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments to which the entity is exposed at the end of the reporting period [IFRS 7 31]. IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures

IFRS 7 requires certain disclosures to be presented by category of an instrument based on the IFRS 9 recognition and measurement categories of financial instruments (previously the IAS 39 measurement categories). IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures

Certain other disclosures are required by class of financial instrument. For those disclosures an entity must group its financial instruments into classes of similar instruments as appropriate to the nature of the … Read more

IFRS 7 Credit risk disclosures

IFRS 7 Credit risk disclosures – Credit risk is part of the risk disclosures requirements under IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures.

Management should disclose information that enables users of its financial statements to evaluate the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments to which the entity is exposed at the end of the reporting period [IFRS 7 31]. The disclosures require focus on the risks that arise from financial instruments and how they have been managed. These risks typically include, but are not limited to, credit risk, liquidity risk and market risk [IFRS 7 32].

Qualitative and quantitative disclosures are required. Management should therefore disclose, for each type of risk arising from financial instruments:… Read more

IFRS 15 Presentation in main statements

IFRS 15 Presentation in main statements – While an entity must provide sufficient information to meet the objective, the disclosures described in the standards are not intended to be a checklist of minimum requirements. That is, entities do not need to include disclosures that are not relevant or are not material to them. In addition, an entity does not need to disclose information in accordance with the revenue standards if it discloses that information in accordance with another standard.

Entities are required to consider the level of detail necessary to satisfy the disclosure objective and the degree of emphasis to place on each of the various requirements. The level of aggregation or disaggregation of disclosures requires judgement. Furthermore, entities are … Read more