Example accounting policies

Example accounting policies

Get the requirements for properly disclosing the accounting policies to provide the users of your financial statements with useful financial data, in the common language prescribed in the world’s most widely used standards for financial reporting, the IFRS Standards. First there is a section providing guidance on what the requirements are, followed by a comprehensive example, easy to tailor to the specific needs of your company.Example accounting policies

Example accounting policies guidance

Whether to disclose an accounting policy

1. In deciding whether a particular accounting policy should be disclosed, management considers whether disclosure would assist users in understanding how transactions, other events and conditions are reflected in the reported financial performance and financial position. Disclosure of particular accounting policies is especially useful to users where those policies are selected from alternatives allowed in IFRS. [IAS 1.119]

2. Some IFRSs specifically require disclosure of particular accounting policies, including choices made by management between different policies they allow. For example, IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment requires disclosure of the measurement bases used for classes of property, plant and equipment and IFRS 3 Business Combinations requires disclosure of the measurement basis used for non-controlling interest acquired during the period.

3. In this guidance, policies are disclosed that are specific to the entity and relevant for an understanding of individual line items in the financial statements, together with the notes for those line items. Other, more general policies are disclosed in the note 25 in the example below. Where permitted by local requirements, entities could consider moving these non-entity-specific policies into an Appendix.

Change in accounting policy – new and revised accounting standards

4. Where an entity has changed any of its accounting policies, either as a result of a new or revised accounting standard or voluntarily, it must explain the change in its notes. Additional disclosures are required where a policy is changed retrospectively, see note 26 for further information. [IAS 8.28]

5. New or revised accounting standards and interpretations only need to be disclosed if they resulted in a change in accounting policy which had an impact in the current year or could impact on future periods. There is no need to disclose pronouncements that did not have any impact on the entity’s accounting policies and amounts recognised in the financial statements. [IAS 8.28]

6. For the purpose of this edition, it is assumed that RePort Co. PLC did not have to make any changes to its accounting policies, as it is not affected by the interest rate benchmark reforms, and the other amendments summarised in Appendix D are only clarifications that did not require any changes. However, this assumption will not necessarily apply to all entities. Where there has been a change in policy, this will need to be explained, see note 26 for further information.

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Fair value of Cryptographic assets

Fair value of Cryptographic assets

The fair value of a cryptographic asset (‘CA’) might be accounted for or disclosed in financial statements. Fair value might be needed in a variety of situations, including:

Inventory of cryptographic assets held by a broker-trader applying fair value less costs to sell accounting

Expense for third party services paid for in cryptographic assets

Cryptographic assets classified as intangible assets in cases where the revaluation model is used

Expense for employee services paid for in cryptographic assets

Revenue from the perspective of an ICO issuer

Cryptographic assets acquired in a business combination

Disclosure of the fair value for cryptographic assets held on behalf of others

Cryptographic assets held by an investment fund (either measured at fair value or for which fair value is disclosed)

IFRS 13, ‘Fair Value Measurement’, defines fair value as “the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date”, and it sets out a framework for determining fair values under IFRS.

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Deemed cost

Deemed cost is an amount used as a surrogate for cost or depreciated cost at a given date. Subsequent depreciation or amortisation assumes that the entity had initially recognised the asset or liability at the given date and that its cost was equal to the deemed cost.

To put it short – the introduction of deemed cost is a practical simplification to smoothen the first-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards.

But IFRS 1 BC 41 says:

Some measurements in accordance with IFRSs are based on the accumulation of past costs or other transaction data. If an entity has not previously collected the necessary information, collecting or estimating it retrospectively may be costly.  To avoid excessive cost, ED 1 proposed … Read more

Valuation techniques Cost approach

Valuation techniques Cost approach reflects the amount that would be required currently to replace the service capacity of an asset (current replacement cost)

Valuation techniques Market approach

Valuation techniques Market approach uses prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving identical or comparable items

Valuation techniques Income approach

Valuation techniques Income approach converts future amounts (cash flows or income and expenses) to a single current (i.e. discounted) exit price amount.

Revaluation model

The revaluation model. An asset will be carried at its fair value at the revaluation date less subsequent depreciation and/or impairment recordings

Hyperinflation in Argentina

Hyperinflation in Argentina – Argentina is now (October 2019) considered to be a hyperinflationary economy. IAS 29 – Financial Reporting in Hyperinflationary Economies is therefore applicable to entities whose functional currency is the Argentine peso.

Assessment of the situation

Hyperinflation in ArgentinaIAS 29 sets out a number of quantitative and qualitative characteristics for the purpose of assessing whether an economy is hyperinflationary (IAS 29 3), including:

  • the general population prefers to keep its wealth in non-monetary assets or in a relatively stable foreign currency (e.g., the US dollar or the euro);
  • transactions are conducted in terms of a relatively stable foreign currency;
  • sales and purchases on credit take place at prices that compensate for the expected loss of purchasing power
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