Best intro to accounting for cryptocurrencies in 1 view

Best intro to accounting for cryptocurrencies

the basics provides guidance on some of the basic issues encountered in accounting for cryptocurrencies, focussing on the accounting for the holder.

The popularity of cryptocurrencies has soared in recent years, yet they do not fit easily within IFRS’ financial reporting structure.

For example, an approach of accounting for holdings of cryptocurrencies at fair value through profit or loss may seem intuitive but is incompatible with the requirements of IFRS in most circumstances. Here the acceptable methods of accounting for holdings in cryptocurrencies are discussed while touching upon other issues that may be encountered.

Relevant IFRS

IAS 38 Intangible AssetsIAS 2 InventoriesIFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement

What is a cryptocurrency?

Cryptocurrency is digital or ‘virtual’ money, which uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional currency units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptography itself describes the process by which codes are written or generated to allow information to be kept secret.

In contrast to traditional forms of money which are controlled using centralised banking systems, cryptocurrencies use decentralised control. The decentralised control of a cryptocurrency works through a ‘blockchain’, which is a public transaction database, functioning as a distributed ledger.

This has advantages in that two parties can transact with each other directly without the need for an intermediary, saving time and cost.

Read more

Adjusted net asset method negative goodwill example

The adjusted net asset method negative goodwill example is used to value a business based on the difference between the fair market value of the business assets and its liabilities. Depending on the particular purpose or circumstances underlying the valuation, this method sometimes uses the replacement or liquidation value of the company assets less the liabilities.

The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach. This is an example resulting in the recognition of negative goodwill. Other examples are intangible assets and tangible asset.

The valuation expert is again retained to estimate the value of 100 percent of the owners’ equity of a … Read more

Adjusted net asset method tangible asset example

The adjusted net asset method tangible asset example is used to value a business based on the difference between the fair market value of the business assets and its liabilities. Depending on the particular purpose or circumstances underlying the valuation, this method sometimes uses the replacement or liquidation value of the company assets less the liabilities.

The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach. This is an example resulting in the recognition of a revaluation to fair value of a tangible asset. Other examples are intangible assets and negative goodwill.

The valuation expert is again retained to estimate the value of 100 percent … Read more

Asset accumulation valuation example

Asset accumulation valuation example  – The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach. Here is an example of the asset accumulation method:

A valuation expert has been retained to estimate the fair market value of the total equity of Brown Client Company (“Brown”) as of December 31, 2016. Let’s assume that Brown is a family-owned construction contractor company. Asset accumulation valuation example

The valuation expert decided to use the asset-based valuation approach and the asset accumulation valuation method. sset accumulation valuation example

The Brown GAAP-basis balance sheet for December 31, 2016, is presented on Exhibit 1. All financial data are presented in … Read more

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method – The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach.

The asset accumulation method is well suited for business and security valuations performed for transaction, taxation, and controversy purposes. All business valuation approaches and methods can indicate the defined value of the subject business entity. IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method

In addition, the asset accumulation method also helps to explain the concluded value—by specifically identifying the value impact of each category of the subject entity assets and liabilities.

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation methodThis informational content of the asset accumulation method is particularly useful in a transaction, taxation, or controversy context when the particular analysis … Read more

Hyperinflation in Argentina

Hyperinflation in Argentina – Argentina is now (October 2019) considered to be a hyperinflationary economy. IAS 29 – Financial Reporting in Hyperinflationary Economies is therefore applicable to entities whose functional currency is the Argentine peso.

Assessment of the situation

Hyperinflation in ArgentinaIAS 29 sets out a number of quantitative and qualitative characteristics for the purpose of assessing whether an economy is hyperinflationary (IAS 29 3), including:

  • the general population prefers to keep its wealth in non-monetary assets or in a relatively stable foreign currency (e.g., the US dollar or the euro);
  • transactions are conducted in terms of a relatively stable foreign currency;
  • sales and purchases on credit take place at prices that compensate for the expected loss of purchasing power
Read more

Revaluation model

The revaluation model. An asset will be carried at its fair value at the revaluation date less subsequent depreciation and/or impairment recordings

Intangible valuation approach

Intangible valuation approachIntangible valuation approach – Valuation assignments must estimate the value of intangibles, recognising the volatility, ongoing creation and problems with protection and enforcement. Business valuation analysts have been independently valuing intangible assets for many years, usually in the context of an exchange between owners (transaction), for estate and gift tax purposes or as part of a litigation assignment. Knowledge underlies the creation of value. Some of the questions that need to be answered include the following:

Financial reporting Read more

Fair Value of Tangible Assets

Fair Value of Tangible Assets – In the event of Business Combinations tangible assets (current – non-current) are best valued with the market or income approaches. If adequate data are not available to derive an indication of value through these methods, an appraiser may use the replacement cost method, which adjusts the original cost for changes in the price level to determine its current replacement cost. The current replacement cost is then adjusted due to physical use or functional obsolescence.Cash-generating unit (CGU) Cash-generating unit (CGU)

Property, Plant and Equipment (PP&E) must be recognized at fair value for current capacity. Accumulated depreciation is not carried forward. An appraiser may use the cost approach, in which a market participant would pay no more for an asset … Read more