IAS 1 Presentation of financial statements

IAS 1 Presentation of financial statements

Objective

IAS 1 Presentation of financial statements provides the basis for presentation of general-purpose financial statements, to ensure:

  • comparability both with the entity’s financial statements of previous periods, and
  • with the financial statements of other entities.

To achieve this objective, IAS 1 sets out overall requirements for the presentation of financial statements, guidelines for their structure and minimum requirements for their content.

The illustration below shows an overview of the purpose, overall considerations, and components of financial statements.

IAS 1 Technical summary

Fundamental concepts/conventions for FS

Fair presentation and compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs)

  • Financial statements shall present fairly the financial position, financial performance and cash flows of an entity
  • An entity whose financial statements
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IAS 16 Generation assets for Power and Utilities

Generation assets for Power and Utilities

– are often large and complex installations. They are expensive to construct, tend to be exposed to harsh operating conditions and require periodic replacement or repair. This environment leads to specific accounting issues.

1 Fixed assets and components

IFRS has a specific requirement for ‘component’ depreciation, as described in IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment. Each significant part of an item of property, plant and equipment is depreciated separately. Significant parts of an asset that have similar useful lives and patterns of consumption can be grouped together. This requirement can create complications for utility entities, because many assets include components with a shorter useful life than the asset as a whole.

Identifying components of an asset

Generation assets might comprise a significant number of components, many of which will have differing useful lives. The significant components of these types of assets must be separately identified. This can be a complex process, particularly on transition to IFRS, because the detailed record-keeping needed for componentisation might not have been required in order to comply with national generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). This can particularly be an issue for older power plants. However, some regulators require detailed asset records, which can be useful for IFRS component identification purposes.

An entity might look to its operating data if the necessary information for components is not readily identified by the accounting records. Some components can be identified by considering the routine shutdown or overhaul schedules for power stations and the associated replacement and maintenance routines. Consideration should also be given to those components that are prone to technological obsolescence, corrosion or wear and tear that is more severe than that of the other portions of the larger asset.

First-time IFRS adopters can benefit from an exemption under IFRS 1 First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards. This exemption allows entities to use a value that is not depreciated cost in accordance with IAS 16, and IAS 23 Borrowing Costs as deemed cost on transition to IFRS. It is not necessary to apply the exemption to all assets or to a group of assets.

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The Statement of Cash Flows

A Historical Perspective on the Statement of Cash Flows

In 1987, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an accounting standard, FASB Statement no. 95, requiring that the statement of cash flows be presented as one of the three primary financial statements. Previously, companies had been required to present a statement of changes in financial position, often called the funds statement. In 1971, APC Opinion no. 19 made the funds statement a required financial statement although many companies had begun reporting funds flow information several years earlier.

The funds statement provided useful information, but it had several limitations. First, APB Opinion no. 19 allowed considerable flexibility in how funds could be defined and how they were reported on the statement. Read more

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI – IFRS 12 requires disclosures for each of an entity’s subsidiaries that have material non-controlling interests. Such disclosures assist users when estimating future profit or loss and cash flows (for example, by identifying the assets and liabilities that are held by subsidiaries, risk exposures of particular group entities, and those subsidiaries that have significant cash flows). The disclosures are as follows (new disclosures compared to the previous standard are in bold):

  • The subsidiary’s nameDisclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • Its principal place of business (and country of incorporation, if different)Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • The proportion of ownership interests held by non-controlling interestsDisclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • The proportion of voting rights held by noncontrolling interests
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Examples of adjustments of errors

Examples of adjustments of errors – When errors affecting income are discovered, careful analysis is necessary to determine the required action to correct the account balances. As indicated, most errors will be caught and adjusted prior to closing the books. The few material errors not detected until subsequent periods and those that have not already been counterbalanced must be treated as prior-period adjustments. See also ‘Types of errors‘.

The following sections describe and illustrate the procedures to be applied when error adjustments require prior-period adjustments. It is assumed that each of the errors is material. Errors that are discovered usually affect the income tax liability for a prior period. Amended tax returns are usually prepared either to claim Read more

Asset accumulation valuation example

Asset accumulation valuation example  – The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach. Here is an example of the asset accumulation method:

A valuation expert has been retained to estimate the fair market value of the total equity of Brown Client Company (“Brown”) as of December 31, 2016. Let’s assume that Brown is a family-owned construction contractor company. Asset accumulation valuation example

The valuation expert decided to use the asset-based valuation approach and the asset accumulation valuation method. sset accumulation valuation example

The Brown GAAP-basis balance sheet for December 31, 2016, is presented on Exhibit 1. All financial data are presented in … Read more

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method – The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach.

The asset accumulation method is well suited for business and security valuations performed for transaction, taxation, and controversy purposes. All business valuation approaches and methods can indicate the defined value of the subject business entity. IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method

In addition, the asset accumulation method also helps to explain the concluded value—by specifically identifying the value impact of each category of the subject entity assets and liabilities.

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation methodThis informational content of the asset accumulation method is particularly useful in a transaction, taxation, or controversy context when the particular analysis … Read more

IFRS 13 Adjusted net asset method

IFRS 13 Adjusted net asset method and the asset accumulation method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach.

First, the valuation expert typically starts with the subject company’s GAAP-based balance sheet. The valuation expert will use the balance sheet dated closest to the analysis valuation date. Preferably, the valuation expert will use the company’s balance sheet that was prepared just before the analysis valuation date. IFRS 13 Adjusted net asset method

Second, the valuation expert identifies and separates (for further analysis) any non-operating or excess assets reported on the balance sheet. Such assets may include vacant land or other assets held for investment purposes. Such assets may also include those assets that are … Read more

Free cash flow

Free cash flow represents the cash a company generates after cash outflows to support operations and maintain its capital assets. It is a profitability measure

Defined Benefit Pension Plans

In traditional defined benefit pension plans, workers accrue a promise of a regular monthly payment from the date of their retirement until their death, or, in some cases, until the death Defined Benefit Pension Plansof their spouse. The promised life annuity (deferred) is commonly based on a formula linked to an employee’s wages or salary and years of tenure at the sponsoring firm. Defined Benefit Pension Plans

In a typical DB plan the member earns a unit of pension, usually expressed as a percentage of nominal earnings, for each year of credited service/participation. The DB pension may be indexed to inflation but in a number of countries such as the U.S. and Canada, this is uncommon in private sector pensions. Defined Benefit Pension Read more