Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

– provides a narrative providing guidance on users of financial statements’ needs to present financial disclosures in the notes to the financial statements grouped in more logical orders. But there is and never will be a one-size fits all.

Here it has been decided to separately disclose financial assets and liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities, because of the distinct different nature of these classes of assets and liabilities and the resulting different types of disclosures, risks and tabulations.

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities guidance

Disclosing financial assets and liabilities (financial instruments) in one note

Users of financial reports have indicated that they would like to be able to quickly access all of the information about the entity’s financial assets and liabilities in one location in the financial report. The notes are therefore structured such that financial items and non-financial items are discussed separately. However, this is not a mandatory requirement in the accounting standards.

Accounting policies, estimates and judgements

For readers of Financial Statements it is helpful if information about accounting policies that are specific to the entityDisclosure financial assets and liabilitiesand about significant estimates and judgements is disclosed with the relevant line items, rather than in separate notes. However, this format is also not mandatory. For general commentary regarding the disclosures of accounting policies refer to note 25. Commentary about the disclosure of significant estimates and judgements is provided in note 11.

Scope of accounting standard for disclosure of financial instruments

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IFRS 7 does not apply to the following items as they are not financial instruments as defined in paragraph 11 of IAS 32:

  1. prepayments made (right to receive future good or service, not cash or a financial asset)
  2. tax receivables and payables and similar items (statutory rights or obligations, not contractual), or
  3. contract liabilities (obligation to deliver good or service, not cash or financial asset).

While contract assets are also not financial assets, they are explicitly included in the scope of IFRS 7 for the purpose of the credit risk disclosures. Liabilities for sales returns and volume discounts (see note 7(f)) may be considered financial liabilities on the basis that they require payments to the customer. However, they should be excluded from financial liabilities if the arrangement is executory. the Reporting entity Plc determined this to be the case. [IFRS 7.5A]

Classification of preference shares

Preference shares must be analysed carefully to determine if they contain features that cause the instrument not to meet the definition of an equity instrument. If such shares meet the definition of equity, the entity may elect to carry them at FVOCI without recycling to profit or loss if not held for trading.

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Direct participating contracts

Direct participating contracts - Insurance contracts with direct participation features are insurance contracts that are investment-related service contracts

Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17

Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17 – Explanation of recognized amounts from IFRS 4 to IFRS 17

1 Introduction Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17

[IFRS 17 (98), IFRS 17 (93)-(96)]

Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17IFRS 4 requires an entity to disclose information that identifies and explains the amounts in its financial statements arising from insurance contracts. In order to comply with this objective, IFRS 4 outlines what should be disclosed regarding reconciliations, policies, methods and processes but provides limited guidance on how these disclosure requirements should be met.

IFRS 17 requirements are much more extensive. It requires the entity to provide specific reconciliations showing how the net carrying amounts of insurance contracts changed during the period as a Read more

Transition to IFRS 17 Insurance contracts

Transition to IFRS 17 Insurance contractsTransition to IFRS 17 Insurance contracts – IFRS 17 should be applied for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2021. FRS 17 supersedes IFRS 4 [IFRS 17 C34]. Early adoption is permitted if the entity applies IFRS 9 and IFRS 15 not later than on the date of initial application of IFRS 17.

1 January 2021 is the date of initial application of IFRS 17 unless an entity early adopts IFRS 17 [IFRS 17 C1]. The transition date is the beginning of the reporting period immediately preceding the date of initial application. Therefore, if an entity adopts on 1 January 2021, the transition date is 1 January 2020 [IFRS 17 C2].

An entity Read more

Measurement of contracts with participation features

Measurement of contracts with participation features – Entities that issue participating contracts (referred to in the standard as contracts with participation features) provide policyholders with a financial return on the premiums they pay by sharing the performance of underlying items with policyholders. Participating contracts can include cash flows with different characteristics, for example:

  • Cash flows that do not vary with returns from underlying items, e.g., death benefits and financial guarantees Measurement of contracts with participation features
  • Cash flows that vary with returns from underlying items — either via a contractual link to the returns on underlying items or through an entity’s right to exercise discretion in determining payments to policyholders Measurement of contracts with participation features

The cash flows of Read more

Contractual service margin

Contractual service margin – The fourth element of the building blocks in the general model is the contractual service margin (the CSM). This is a component of the asset or liability for the group of insurance contracts that represents the unearned profit the entity will recognise as it provides services in the future.

Here is how the contractual service margin fits into the general model of measurement of insurance contracts. The general model is based on the following estimation parameters:

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Insurance contract discount rates

Insurance contract discount rates – The second element of measuring fulfilment cash flows under the general model is an adjustment to the estimates of future cash flows to reflect the time value of money and financial risks related to those cash flows (to the extent that they are not included in the cash flow estimates).

Here is how the insurance contract discount rates fit into the general model of measurement of insurance contracts. The general model is based on the following estimation parameters:

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Introduction IFRS 17 Insurance contracts

Introduction IFRS 17 Insurance contracts – More than 20 years in development, IFRS 17 represents a complete overhaul of accounting for insurance contracts. The new standard applies a current value approach to measuring insurance contracts and recognises profit as insurers provide services and are released from risk. Introduction IFRS 17 Insurance contracts

The profit or loss earned from underwriting activities are reported separately from financing activities. Detailed note disclosures explain how items like new business issued, experience in the year, cash receipts and payments, and changes in assumptions affected the performance and the carrying amount of insurance contracts. Introduction IFRS 17 Insurance contracts

IFRS 17 establishes principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of insurance contracts issued, reinsurance contracts Read more

Variable fee approach

The variable fee approach is applied to insurance contracts with direct participation features that contain certain eligibility criteria at initial recognition

General model in Insurance contracts measurement

The general model of measurement of insurance contracts in IFRS 17 is based on estimates of the fulfilment cash flows and contractual service margin.