IFRS 15 Real estate Revenue complete and accurate recognition

IFRS 15 Real estate

Under IFRS 15 real estate entities recognize revenue over the construction period if certain conditions are met.

Key points

  • An entity must judge whether the different elements of a contract can be separated from each other based on the distinct criteria. A more complex judgment exists for real estate developers that provide services or deliver common properties or amenities in addition to the property being sold.
  • Contract modifications are common in the real estate development industry. Contract modifications might needIFRS 15 Real estate to be accounted for as a new contract, or combined and accounted for together with an existing contract.
  • Real estate managers may structure their arrangements such that services and fees are in different contracts. These contracts may meet the requirements to be accounted for as a combined contract when applying IFRS 15.
  • Real estate management entities are often entitled to several different fees. IFRS 15 will require a manager to consider whether the services should be viewed as a single performance obligation, or whether some of these services are ‘distinct’ and should therefore be treated as separate performance obligations.
  • Variable consideration for entities in the real estate industry may come in the form of claims, awards and incentive payments, discounts, rebates, refunds, credits, price concessions, performance bonuses, penalties or other similar items.
  • Real estate developers will need to consider whether they meet any of the three criteria necessary for recognition of revenue over time.

IFRS 15 core principle

The core principle of IFRS 15 is that revenue reflects the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

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5 steps in IFRS 15 – best quick read

5 steps in IFRS 15

Under IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers, entities apply the 5 steps in IFRS 15 to determine when to recognize revenue, and at what amount. The model specifies that revenue is recognized when or as an entity transfers control of goods or services to a customer at the amount to which the entity expects to be entitled. Depending on whether certain criteria are met, revenue is recognized:

  • over time, in a manner that best reflects the entity’s performance; or
  • at a point in time, when control of the goods or services is transferred to the customer.

IFRS 15 provides application guidance on numerous related topics, including warranties and licenses. It also provides guidance on when to capitalize the costs of obtaining a contract and some costs of fulfilling a contract (specifically those that are not addressed in other relevant authoritative guidance – e.g. for inventory).

5 steps in IFRS 15 – What is IFRS 15?

Step 1: Identify the contract with a customer

A contract with a customer is in the scope of IFRS 15 when the contract is legally enforceable and certain criteria are met. If the criteria are not met, then the contract does not exist for purposes of applying the general model of IFRS 15, and any consideration received from the customer is generally recognized as a deposit (liability). Contracts entered into at or near the same time with the same customer (or a related party of the customer) are combined and treated as a single contract when certain criteria are met.

A contract with a customer is in the scope of IFRS 15 when it is legally enforceable and meets all of the following criteria. [IFRS 15.9]

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What is a good or service that is distinct?

What is a good or service that is distinct?

– IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (contents page is here) introduced a single and comprehensive framework which sets out how much revenue is to be recognised, and when. The core principle is that a vendor should recognise revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the vendor expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. See a summary of IFRS 15 here. What is a good or service that is distinct?

Determining a distinct good or service is part of identifying separate performance obligations. An important item to look at … Read more

Series provision

Series provision – IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (contents page is here) introduced a single and comprehensive framework which sets out how much revenue is to be recognised, and when. The core principle is that a vendor should recognise revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the vendor expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. See a summary of IFRS 15 here.Series provision

Under IFRS 15 a series of distinct goods or services that are substantially the same and have the same pattern of transfer to the customer are accounted for as a single performance obligation.

As … Read more

Dealer sales vehicle incentives

Dealer sales vehicle incentives – Some automotive entities (including automotive parts suppliers (APSs) and original equipment manufacturers (original equipment manufacturers (OEM)s)) needed to change certain revenue recognition practices as a result of applying the revenue recognition standard, IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.  These standards superseded virtually all previous revenue recognition requirements in IFRS and US GAAP. Original equipment manufacturers need to use significant judgement when they identify separate performance obligations (i.e., units of account), which may be different from those identified under IAS 18.

original equipment manufacturers (OEM)s frequently offer sales incentives in contracts to sell vehicles to dealers. These sales incentives may include cash rebates, bonuses or other types of incentives made available to Read more

Long-term supply contracts

Long-term supply contracts – To apply IFRS 15, automotive parts suppliers (APSs) will need to change the way they evaluate long-term supply contracts. APSs need to use significant judgement when they identify separate performance obligations (i.e., units of account), which may be different from those identified under IAS 18.

Tooling equipmentLong-term supply contracts

APSs commonly enter into long-term arrangements with Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to provide specific parts, such as seat belts or steering wheels. An arrangement typically includes the construction for the tooling, which is required to be used when manufacturing the parts to meet the OEM’s specifications. In many cases, the APS will construct and transfer the legal title for the tooling to the OEM after construction, even though they … Read more

Distinct goods or services

Distinct goods or services is a cornerstone of IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers. Distinct means the customer can benefit directly from the service