M and A

M and A or Mergers and Acquisitions

in IFRS language Business Combinations.

1 Identifying a business combination

IFRS 3 refers to a ‘business combination’ rather than more commonly used phrases such as takeover, acquisition or merger because the objective is to encompass all the transactions in which an acquirer obtains control over an acquiree no matter how the transaction is structured. A business combination is defined as a transaction or other event in which an acquirer (an investor entity) obtains control of one or more businesses.

An entity’s purchase of a controlling interest in another unrelated operating entity will usually be a business combination (see Simple case – Straightforward business combination below). However, a business combination (M and A) may be structured, and an entity may obtain control of that structure, in a variety of ways.

Examples of business combinations structurings

Examples of ways an entity may obtain control

A business becomes the subsidiary of an acquirer

The entity transfers cash, cash equivalents or other assets(including net assets that constitute a business)

Net assets of one or more businesses are legally merged with an acquirer

The entity incurs liabilities

One combining entity transfers its net assets, or its owners transfer their equity interests, to another combining entity or its owners

The entity issues shares

The entity transfers more than one type of consideration, or

Two or more entities transfer their net assets, or the owners of those entities transfer their equity interests to a newly created entity, which in exchange issues shares, or

The entity does not transfer consideration and obtains control for example by contract alone Some examples of this:

  • ‘dual listed companies’ or ‘stapled entity structures’
  • acquiree repurchases a sufficient number of its own shares for an existing shareholder to obtain control
  • a condition in the shareholder agreement that prevents the majority shareholder exercising control of the entity has expired, or
  • a call option over a controlling interest that becomes exercisable.

A group of former owners of one of the combining entities obtains control of the combined entity, i.e. former owners, as a group, retain control of the entity they previously owned.

Therefore, identifying a business combination transaction requires the determination of whether:

  • what is acquired constitutes a ‘business’ as defined in IFRS3, and
  • control has been obtained.

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11 Best fair value measurements under IFRS 13

11 Best fair value measurements under IFRS 13 – Several IFRS standards provide guidance regarding the scope and application of for assets and liabilities. Here they are from 1 to 11…….

1 Investments in associates and joint ventures

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IFRS 3 Identify a business

IFRS 3 Identify a business – An entity shall determine whether a transaction or other event is a business combination by applying the definition in IFRS 3, which requires that the assets acquired and liabilities assumed constitute a business. If the assets acquired are not a business, the reporting entity shall account for the transaction or other event as an asset acquisitionSee also the accounting treatment acquisition of a business or asset(s) 

Guidance on identifying a business combination and the definition of a business are as follows:

The definition of a business: An integrated set of activities and assets that is capable of being conducted and managed for the purpose of providing goods or services to customers, generating investment income (such as dividends or interest) or generating other income from ordinary activities.

Identifying a business combination [IFRS 3 B5 – B6] IFRS 3 Identify a business

IFRS 3 defines a business combination as a transaction or other event in which an acquirer obtains control of one or more businesses. An acquirer might obtain control of an acquiree in a variety IFRS 3 Identify a businessof ways, for example:

  1. by transferring cash, cash equivalents or other assets (including net assets that constitute a business);
  2. by incurring liabilities; IFRS 3 Identify a business
  3. by issuing equity interests; IFRS 3 Identify a business
  4. by providing more than one type of consideration; or
  5. without transferring consideration, including by contract alone.

A business combination may be structured in a variety of ways for legal, taxation or other reasons, which include but are not limited to:

  1. one or more businesses become subsidiaries of an acquirer or the net assets of one or more businesses are legally merged into the acquirer;
  2. one combining entity transfers its net assets, or its owners transfer their equity interests, to another combining entity or its owners;
  3. all of the combining entities transfer their net assets, or the owners of those entities transfer their equity interests, to a newly formed entity (sometimes referred to as a roll-up or put-together transaction); or
  4. a group of former owners of one of the combining entities obtains control of the combined entity.

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Overview of the amendments IFRS 3

Overview of the amendments IFRS 3 – In May 2019 amendments to IFRS 3 Business Combinations were published by IASB.

IFRS 3 continues to adopt a market participant’s perspective to determine whether an acquired set of activities and assets is a business. The amendments: clarify the minimum requirements for a business; remove the assessment of whether Read more

IFRS 3 Acquired process is substantive?

IFRS 3 Acquired process is substantive? – IFRS 3 requires a business to include, as a minimum, an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create output. Because all asset include inputs, the existence of a substantive process is what distinguishes an asset or … Read more