1 Best Complete Read – Financial Instruments

Financial Instruments is a summary of the current (Financial Statements preparation for 2020 on wards) IFRS reporting requirements relating to the combination of IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation, IFRS 7 Financial instruments: Disclosure and IFRS 9 Financial Instruments, into one overall narrative.

IFRS standards for Financial Instruments have a complicated history. It was originally intended that IFRS 9 would replace IAS 39 in its entirety. However, in response to requests from interested parties that the accounting for financial instruments be improved quickly, the project to replace IAS 39 was divided into three main phases.

The three main phases of the project to replace IAS 39 were:

  1. Phase 1: classification and measurement of financial assets and financial liabilities.
  2. Phase
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IFRS vs US GAAP Employee benefits

IFRS vs US GAAP Employee benefits

The following discussion captures a number of the more significant GAAP differences under both the impairment standards. It is important to note that the discussion is not inclusive of all GAAP differences in this area.

The significant differences and similarities between U.S. GAAP and IFRS related to accounting for investment property are summarized in the following tables.

Standards Reference

US GAAP1

IFRS2

715 Compensation – Retirement benefits

710-10 Compensation- General – Overall

712-10 Compensation – Nonretirement Postemployment Benefits – Overall

IAS 19 Employee Benefits

IFRIC 14 The limit on a defined benefit asset minimum funding requirements and their interaction

Introduction

The guidance under US GAAP and IFRS as it relates to employee benefits contains some significant differences with potentially far-reaching implications.

This narrative deals with employee benefits provided under formal plans and agreements between an entity and its employees, under legislation or through industry arrangements, including those provided under informal practices that give rise to constructive obligations.

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Setting 1 complete scene the Expected Credit Losses model

the Expected Credit Losses model

Setting the scene the Expected Credit Losses model, start here to get a good understanding of ECL loss allowances or continue, you decide……

The Expected Credit Losses model (ECL) should be applied to:Setting the scene: the Expected Credit Losses model

  • investments in debt instruments measured at amortized cost;
  • investments in debt instruments measured at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI);
  • all loan commitments not measured at fair value through profit or loss;
  • financial guarantee contracts to which IFRS 9 is applied and that are not accounted for at fair value through profit or loss; and
  • lease receivables that are within the scope of IFRS 16 Leases, and trade receivables or contract assets within the scope of IFRS 15
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IFRS 9 ECL Model best read – Impairment of investments and loans

Impairment of investments and loans

is about impairment in a ‘normal’ business not complicated accounting but straightforward accounting calculations.

Normal operations

Although the focus for IFRS 9 Financial Instruments is on financial institutions such as banks and insurance companies, ‘normal’ operating entities are also affected by IFRS 9. Maybe their investment and loan portfolios are less complex but in operating a business and as part of the internal credit risk management practice policy making it is still important to implement the impairment model under IFRS 9 Financial Instruments.

The objective of these approaches to expected credit losses or timely recording of impairments/loss allowances is to provide approaches that result in a situation in which very different reporting entities all … Read more

Excellent Study IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

the insured items of business risk exposures

Although the popular definition of hedging is an investment taken out to limit the risk of another investment, insurance is an example of a real-world hedge.

Every entity is exposed to business risks from its daily operations. Many of those risks have an impact on the cash flows or the value of assets and liabilities, and therefore, ultimately affect profit or loss. In order to manage these risk exposures, companies often enter into derivative contracts (or, less commonly, other financial instruments) to hedge them. Hedging can, therefore, be seen as a risk management activity in order to change an entity’s risk profile.

The idea of hedge accounting is to reduce (insure) this mismatch by changing either the measurement or (in the case of certain firm commitments) FRS 9 Eligible Hedged itemsrecognition of the hedged exposure, or the accounting for the hedging instrument.

The definition of a Hedged item

A hedged item is an asset, liability, firm commitment, highly probable forecast transaction or net investment in a foreign operation that

  1. exposes the entity to risk of changes in fair value or future cash flows and
  2. is designated as being hedged

The hedge item can be:

Only assets, liabilities, firm commitments and forecast transactions with an external party qualify for hedge accounting. As an exception, a hedge of the foreign currency risk of an intragroup monetary item qualifies for hedge accounting if that foreign currency risk affects consolidated profit or loss. In addition, the foreign currency risk of a highly probable forecast intragroup transaction would also qualify as a hedged item if that transaction affects consolidated profit or loss. These requirements are unchanged from IAS 39.

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Leveraged buyout IFRS 3 best reporting

Leveraged buyout IFRS 3 best reporting – In corporate finance, a leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction where a company is acquired using debt as the main source of consideration. These transactions typically occur when a private equity (PE) firm borrows as much as they can from a variety of lenders (up to 70 or 80 percent of the purchase price) and funds the balance with their own equity. Leveraged buyout IFRS 3 best reporting

1 The process and business reason

The use of leverage (debt) enhances expected returns to the private equity firm. By putting in as little of their own money as possible, PE firms can achieve a large return on equity (ROE) and internal rate of return … Read more

IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures

IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures – Management should disclose information that enables users of its financial statements to evaluate the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments to which the entity is exposed at the end of the reporting period [IFRS 7 31]. IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures

IFRS 7 requires certain disclosures to be presented by category of an instrument based on the IFRS 9 recognition and measurement categories of financial instruments (previously the IAS 39 measurement categories). IFRS 7 Comprehensive Risk disclosures

Certain other disclosures are required by class of financial instrument. For those disclosures an entity must group its financial instruments into classes of similar instruments as appropriate to the nature of the … Read more

Curing of a credit-impaired financial asset

Curing of a credit-impaired financial asset presents the explanation of what a credit-impaired financial asset is, how to account for a credit-impaired asset as long as it is credit-impaired and how to account for a credit-impaired asset that is no longer credit-impaired (i.e. curing of a credit-impaired financial asset which means the borrower has, for example, restructured its business and cash flow recovered sufficiently to return paying all interest and principal as per the original contract). Curing of a credit-impaired financial asset

Credit-impaired assets

A financial asset is credit-impaired when one or more events that have a detrimental impact on the estimated future cash flows of that financial asset have occurred. Evidence that a financial asset is credit-impaired include observable … Read more

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments Measurement

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments Measurement uses the following criteria for determining the classification and measurement of financial assets at Amortized Cost, Fair Value through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI) or Fair Value through Profit or Loss (FVPL):

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments Measurement

The critical issues for classifying and measuring financial assets are whether:

  • The objective of the entity’s business model is to hold assets only to collect cash flows, or to collect cash flows and to sell (“the Business Model test”), and

  • The contractual cash flows of an asset give rise to payments on specified dates that are solely payments of principal and interest (“SPPI”) on the principal amount outstanding (“the SPPI test”). IFRS 9 Financial Instruments Measurement

Both of these … Read more