IAS 16 Generation assets for Power and Utilities

Generation assets for Power and Utilities

– are often large and complex installations. They are expensive to construct, tend to be exposed to harsh operating conditions and require periodic replacement or repair. This environment leads to specific accounting issues.

1 Fixed assets and components

IFRS has a specific requirement for ‘component’ depreciation, as described in IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment. Each significant part of an item of property, plant and equipment is depreciated separately. Significant parts of an asset that have similar useful lives and patterns of consumption can be grouped together. This requirement can create complications for utility entities, because many assets include components with a shorter useful life than the asset as a whole.

Identifying components of an asset

Generation assets might comprise a significant number of components, many of which will have differing useful lives. The significant components of these types of assets must be separately identified. This can be a complex process, particularly on transition to IFRS, because the detailed record-keeping needed for componentisation might not have been required in order to comply with national generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). This can particularly be an issue for older power plants. However, some regulators require detailed asset records, which can be useful for IFRS component identification purposes.

An entity might look to its operating data if the necessary information for components is not readily identified by the accounting records. Some components can be identified by considering the routine shutdown or overhaul schedules for power stations and the associated replacement and maintenance routines. Consideration should also be given to those components that are prone to technological obsolescence, corrosion or wear and tear that is more severe than that of the other portions of the larger asset.

First-time IFRS adopters can benefit from an exemption under IFRS 1 First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards. This exemption allows entities to use a value that is not depreciated cost in accordance with IAS 16, and IAS 23 Borrowing Costs as deemed cost on transition to IFRS. It is not necessary to apply the exemption to all assets or to a group of assets.

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IFRS vs US GAAP Investment property – Broken in 10 great excellent reads

IFRS vs US GAAP Investment property

The following discussion captures a number of the more significant GAAP differences under both the impairment standards. It is important to note that the discussion is not inclusive of all GAAP differences in this area.

The significant differences and similarities between U.S. GAAP and IFRS related to accounting for investment property are summarized in the following tables.

Standards Reference

US GAAP1

IFRS2

360 Property, Plant and equipment

IAS 40 Investment property

Introduction

The guidance under US GAAP and IFRS as it relates to investment property contains some significant differences with potentially far-reaching implications.

Links to detailed observations by subject

Definition and classification Initial measurement Subsequent measurement
Fair value model Cost model Subsequent expenditure
Timing of transfers Measurement of transfers Redevelopment
Disposals

Overview

US GAAP

IFRS

Unlike IFRS Standards, there is no specific definition of ‘investment property’; such property is accounted for as property, plant and equipment unless it meets the criteria to be classified as held-for-sale.

‘Investment property’ is property (land or building) held by the owner or lessee to earn rentals or for capital appreciation, or both.

Unlike IFRS Standards, there is no guidance on how to classify dual-use property. Instead, the entire property is accounted for as property, plant and equipment.

A portion of a dual-use property is classified as investment property only if the portion could be sold or leased out under a finance lease. Otherwise, the entire property is classified as investment property only if the portion of the property held for own use is insignificant.

Unlike IFRS Standards, ancillary services provided by a lessor do not affect the treatment of a property as property, plant and equipment.

If a lessor provides ancillary services, and such services are a relatively insignificant component of the arrangement as a whole, then the property is classified as investment property.

Like IFRS Standards, investment property is initially measured at cost as property, plant and equipment.

Investment property is initially measured at cost.

Unlike IFRS Standards, subsequent to initial recognition all investment property is measured using the cost model as property, plant and equipment.

Subsequent to initial recognition, all investment property is measured under either the fair value model (subject to limited exceptions) or the cost model.

If the fair value model is chosen, then changes in fair value are recognised in profit or loss.

Unlike IFRS Standards, there is no requirement to disclose the fair value of investment property.

Disclosure of the fair value of all investment property is required, regardless of the measurement model used.

Similar to IFRS Standards, subsequent expenditure is generally capitalised if it is probable that it will give rise to future economic benefits.

Subsequent expenditure is capitalised only if it is probable that it will give rise to future economic benefits.

Unlike IFRS Standards, investment property is accounted for as property, plant and equipment, and there are no transfers to or from an ‘investment property’ category.

Transfers to or from investment property can be made only when there has been a change in the use of the property.

IFRS vs US GAAP Investment property IFRS vs US GAAP Investment property IFRS vs US GAAP Investment property

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Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15 Complete and Exemplary Read

Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Barter transactions are the exchange of goods or services, in exchange for other goods or services

IFRS References: IFRS 15, IAS 16, IAS 38, IAS 40 Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

If an entity enters into a non-monetary exchange with a customer as part of its ordinary activities, then generally it applies the guidance on non-cash consideration in the IFRS 15 Revenue standard. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Non-monetary exchanges with non-customers do not give rise to revenue. If a non-monetary exchange of assets with a non-customer has commercial substance, then the transaction gives rise to a gain or loss. The cost of the asset acquired is generally the fair value of the asset surrendered, adjusted for any cash transferred. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Simple bartering involves no cost as this involves exchanging goods and/or services of the same value.

A barter exchange operates as a broker and bank in which each participating member has an account that is debited when purchasesNon-monetary transactions IFRS 15 are made, and credited when sales are made. Compared to one-to-one bartering, concerns over unequal exchanges are reduced in a barter exchange.

The exchange plays an important role because it provides the record-keeping, brokering expertise and monthly statements to each member. Commercial exchanges make money by charging a commission on each transaction on either the buy or sell side, or a combination of both. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

In general, one requirement remains in tact in non-monetary transactions, revenue cannot be recognised if the amount of revenue is not reliably measurable. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

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11 Best fair value measurements under IFRS 13

11 Best fair value measurements under IFRS 13 – Several IFRS standards provide guidance regarding the scope and application of for assets and liabilities. Here they are from 1 to 11…….

1 Investments in associates and joint ventures

Investments held by venture capital organizations and the like are exempt from IAS 28’s requirements … Read more

IAS 41 Agricultural activity and produce

IAS 41 Agricultural activity and produce – The objective of IAS 41 is to prescribe the accounting treatment and disclosures related to agricultural activity.IAS 41 Agricultural activity and produce

Scope IAS 41 Agricultural activity and produce

IAS 41 shall be applied to account for the following when they relate to agricultural activity:

  1. biological assets, except for bearer plants; IAS 41 Agricultural activity and produce
  2. agricultural produce at the point of harvest; and
  3. conditional or unconditional grants relating to a biological asset measured at its fair value less costs to sell.

IAS 41 does not apply to:

  1. land related to agricultural activity;
  2. bearer plants related to agricultural activity. However, IAS 41 applies to the produce on those bearer plants;
  3. government grants related to bearer plants;
  4. intangible
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Government grants and assistance

The receipt of government grants and assistance by an entity may be significant for the preparation of the financial statements for two reasons. Firstly, if resources Government grants and assistancehave been transferred, an appropriate method of accounting for the transfer must be found. Secondly, it is desirable to give an indication of the extent to which the entity has benefited from such assistance during the reporting period. This facilitates comparison of an entity’s financial statements with those of prior periods and with those of other entities.

Scope/Objective

IAS 20 is applied in accounting for, and in the disclosure of, government grants and in the disclosure of other forms of government assistance.

Government grants are sometimes called by other names such as subsidies, subventions … Read more

Purchase price of PPE

Purchase price of PPE – Here is one complete case of the purchase price and other cost that may be capitalised when acquiring a non-current asset in the day-to-day business.

THE CASE Purchase price of property

Entity K purchased a plant for a gross price of CU 200 million. The seller granted a 0.5% rebate. The gross price includes excise duty CU 18 million for which the buyer entity will get a tax refund and non-refundable VAT of CU 10 million. The company has also incurred CU 15 million for transportation costs, handling charges and insurance, CU 5 million for installation and CU 3 million for testing and technical engineering fees. It has earned CU 0.2 million from selling goods Read more

Valuation of Intangibles on Acquisition – How 2 use at your best advantage

Valuation of Intangibles on Acquisition

In Valuation of Intangibles on Acquisition a lot of practical examples are shown to be used as a tool of reference when challenging a valuation in real life.

THE CASE: Shockwave Corporation

  • Shockwave Corporation is the largest satellite radio provider in the country. Shockwave commenced operations five years ago when the government granted satellite spectrum licenses to four start-ups seeking to cultivate a then-burgeoning industry. Since that time, precipitated by the accelerating wireless data needs of telecommunication industry technology, the government has stated that it will not be licensing any new spectrum for satellite radio but may approve the sale or transfer of existing spectrum.
  • Shockwave generates its revenue from monthly subscriptions to consumers sourced
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IAS 41 Agricultural activity

IAS 41 Definition of agricultural activity -  The management by an entity of the biological transformation and harvest of biological assets

16 Best Questions to Ask about the Statement of Performance

Questions to Ask about the Statement of Performance

The Statement of Performance (consisting of the Statement of Income ifrs and the Statement of Other Comprehensive Income ifrs) has to be questioned, first Revenue then Expenditures. Questions to Ask about the Statement of Performance

The questions that apply to revenues raised to support operations tend to be identical for the many potential sources. They are:

  • Who provides each category of revenue to the organization and why? Are there restrictions on how these revenues are used?
  • What are the costs associated with raising this kind of revenue? Is the effort of raising these funds worthwhile? Are there opportunities to increase revenues from this source?
  • In particular, what are our fundraising
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