Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

– provides a narrative providing guidance on users of financial statements’ needs to present financial disclosures in the notes to the financial statements grouped in more logical orders. But there is and never will be a one-size fits all.

Here it has been decided to separately disclose financial assets and liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities, because of the distinct different nature of these classes of assets and liabilities and the resulting different types of disclosures, risks and tabulations.

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities guidance

Disclosing financial assets and liabilities (financial instruments) in one note

Users of financial reports have indicated that they would like to be able to quickly access all of the information about the entity’s financial assets and liabilities in one location in the financial report. The notes are therefore structured such that financial items and non-financial items are discussed separately. However, this is not a mandatory requirement in the accounting standards.

Accounting policies, estimates and judgements

For readers of Financial Statements it is helpful if information about accounting policies that are specific to the entityDisclosure financial assets and liabilitiesand about significant estimates and judgements is disclosed with the relevant line items, rather than in separate notes. However, this format is also not mandatory. For general commentary regarding the disclosures of accounting policies refer to note 25. Commentary about the disclosure of significant estimates and judgements is provided in note 11.

Scope of accounting standard for disclosure of financial instruments

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IFRS 7 does not apply to the following items as they are not financial instruments as defined in paragraph 11 of IAS 32:

  1. prepayments made (right to receive future good or service, not cash or a financial asset)
  2. tax receivables and payables and similar items (statutory rights or obligations, not contractual), or
  3. contract liabilities (obligation to deliver good or service, not cash or financial asset).

While contract assets are also not financial assets, they are explicitly included in the scope of IFRS 7 for the purpose of the credit risk disclosures. Liabilities for sales returns and volume discounts (see note 7(f)) may be considered financial liabilities on the basis that they require payments to the customer. However, they should be excluded from financial liabilities if the arrangement is executory. the Reporting entity Plc determined this to be the case. [IFRS 7.5A]

Classification of preference shares

Preference shares must be analysed carefully to determine if they contain features that cause the instrument not to meet the definition of an equity instrument. If such shares meet the definition of equity, the entity may elect to carry them at FVOCI without recycling to profit or loss if not held for trading.

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IFRS 7 Complete Maturity analysis disclosure

IFRS 7 Complete Maturity analysis disclosure – IFRS 7 requires certain disclosures to be presented by category of an instrument based on the IFRS 9 recognition and measurement categories of financial instruments.

Certain other disclosures are required by class of financial instrument. For those disclosures an entity must group its financial instruments into classes of similar instruments as appropriate to the nature of the information presented. [IFRS 7 6]

The two main categories of disclosures required by IFRS 7 are:

  1. information about the significance of financial instruments [IFRS 7 7 – 30]
  2. information about the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments [IFRS 7 31 – 42]

So IFRS 7 bets … Read more

The modified historical cost convention

IFRS requires financial statements to be prepared on the modified historical cost convention basis, with a growing emphasis on fair value. ‘Fair value’ is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date – i.e. an exit price. [IFRS 13 9]

The carrying amounts of the following assets and liabilities are based on fair value measurements subsequent to initial recognition.

  • Derivatives, financial assets, and financial liabilities classified as held-for-trading or designated as Read more

Main FS Statements Insurance contracts

Main FS Statements Insurance contracts – These examples of the main Financial Statements statements demonstrate the requirements in respect of presentation and disclosure according to IFRS 17 Insurance contracts. They also includeMain FS Statements Insurance contracts the requirements (introduced or amended) in respect of presentation and disclosure according to IFRS 9 Financial instruments and IFRS 7 Financial instruments: Disclosures.

It is prepared for illustrative purposes only and should be used in conjunction with the relevant financial reporting standards and any other reporting pronouncements and legislation applicable in specific jurisdictions. Main FS Statements Insurance contracts

Presentation of insurance service result Main FS Statements Insurance contracts

 

IFRS 17 83,
85,
B120 – B127

Clarifications:

Insurance revenue reflects the consideration to which the

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Business model assessment

A business model assessment is needed for financial assets that meet the SPPI criterion, to determine whether they classify at amortised cost or FVOCI.

Other business models – How 2 best account it in IFRS 9

Other business models are all those that do not meet the ‘hold to collect’ or ‘hold to collect and sell’ criteria. Like realising cash flows through sale

Hold to collect – How 2 best account it in IFRS 9 classification of financial assets

The objective of the ‘hold to collect’ business model is to hold financial assets to collect their contractual cash flows, rather than to selling the assets

Fair value measurement and disclosure

Fair value measurement and disclosure – The following are some examples of assets and liabilities that fall within the scope of IFRS 13 for the purpose of measurement and/or disclosure.

IFRS=== Financial reporting item Measurement Disclosure
[IAS 39] Financial instruments available-for-sale or held for trading (recurring fair value measurements)

Fair value measurement and disclosure

Fair value measurement and disclosure

 

 

[IAS 39 /

IFRS 7]

Financial instruments held-to-maturity subsequent to initial recognition at amortised costs (so not part of IFRS 13.
[IFRS 1] Fair value as deemed cost by a first-time adopter of IFRS (e.g. for property, plant and equipment) in the year of adoption of IFRS

Fair value measurement

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Trading in securities and loans

Trading in securities and loans – IAS 7 14 includes a number of examples of operating cash flows, including cash Trading in securities and loansreceipts and payments from contracts held for dealing or trading purposes. IAS 7 15 notes that when an entity holds securities and loans for dealing or trading purposes, those items are similar to inventory acquired specifically for resale. As a result, the cash flows arising from the purchase and sale of dealing or trading securities are classified within operating activities.

Consistent with this approach, IAS 7.16(c) and (d) require cash flows which relate to the acquisition or sale of equity or debt instruments of other entities (including interests in joint ventures) to be classified as arising from investing activities, unless … Read more

Classification of cash flows

Classification of cash flows – IAS 7 10 requires an entity to analyse its cash inflows and outflows into three categories:

Operating activities

It is often assumed that this category includes only those cash flows that arise from an entity’s principal revenue producing activities.

However, because cash flows arising from operating activities represents a residual category, which includes any cash flows that do not qualify to be recorded within either investing or financing activities, these can include cash flows that may initially not appear to be ‘operating’ in nature (e.g. cash inflows from other revenue sources that are not from the sale of goods or rendering of services, such as proceeds … Read more