IFRS 9 Proper accounting for Related Company Loans

IFRS 9 Proper accounting for Related Company Loans – IFRS 9 Financial Instruments makes no distinction between unrelated third party and related party transactions. Entities that prepare stand-alone financial statements are required to apply the full provisions of the standard to all transactions within its scope.

This means related company loan receivables must be classified and measured in accordance with the requirements of IFRS 9, including where relevant, applying the Expected Credit Loss (ECL) model for impairment. IFRS 9 Proper accounting for Related Company Loans

Applying IFRS 9 to related company loans can present a number of application challenges as they are often advanced on terms that are not arms-length or sometimes advanced on an informal basis without any terms … Read more

9 Best practical Impairment related company loans

9 Best practical Impairment related company loans – What are related company loans?

Technically not the most difficult question one would think, BUT………

Entities must first consider whether the loan is within the scope of IFRS 9 or another standard. This is because IFRS 9: 2.1(a) scopes out ‘interests in subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures’ that are accounted for in accordance with IAS 27 Separate Financial Statements or IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures i.e. at cost less impairment or using the equity method.

In many cases, it will be clear that the loan is a debt instrument that falls within the scope of IFRS 9 but some scenarios may require a more detailed analysis.

IFRS 9 replaced Read more

Debt instruments at FVOCI

Debt instruments at FVOCI – A debt instrument is classified as subsequently measured at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI) under IFRS 9 if it meets both of the following criteria:

  • Hold to collect and sell business model test: The asset is held withi Series provision of distinct goods or services n a business model whose objective is achieved by both holding the financial asset in order to collect contractual cash flows and selling the financial asset; and
  • SPPI contractual cash flow characteristics test: The contractual terms of the financial asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.

This business model typically involves greater frequency and volume of sales than the hold Read more

Hold to collect

The objective of the ‘hold to collect’ business model is to hold financial assets to collect their contractual cash flows, rather than to selling the assets

Hold to collect and sell

Under the 'hold to collect and sell’ business model, the objective is to both collect the contractual cash flows and sell the financial asset for cash

IFRS 9 The Business Model Test

IFRS 9 The Business Model Test is a necessary condition (see IFRS 9 Classification and Measurement of Financial Instruments) for classifying a loan or receivable at Amortized Cost or FVOCI. The test is about whether the asset is part of a group or portfolio that is being managed within a business model whose objective is to collect contractual cash flows from the non-equity financial asset (Amortized Cost), or to both collect contractual cash flows from the non-equity financial asset and sell the non-equity financial asset (FVOCI). Otherwise, the asset is measured at FVPL. The key elements of this test are listed below.

Observe: IFRS 9 recommends applying the Business Model test before applying the SPPI test because this

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Other business models

Other business models are all those that do not meet the ‘hold to collect’ or ‘hold to collect and sell’ criteria. Like realising cash flows through sale

Accounting policies for financial instruments

Accounting policies for financial instruments – a quite complete overview of all kinds of accounting issues for financial instruments such as measurement categories, initial recognition, amortised costs and effective interest rate, financial assets, impairment, derecognition, financial liabilities, derecognition, and derivatives. Enjoy it!

Summary of significant financial instruments accounting policies

1 Financial assets and liabilities

1.1 Summary of measurement categories

The insurer classifies its financial assets into the following categories:

Business model and cash flow characteristics

Type of financial instruments

Classification

Hold to collect business model and solely payments of principal and interest

Cash and cash equivalents

Amortised cost (AC)

Hold to collect and sell business model and solely payments of principal and interest

Government bonds

Fair value through other

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Fair value through profit or loss

Financial assets measured at fair value through profit or loss 2. This is part of the classification of financial assets, representing the remaining or designated class of financial assets.

Classification of financial assets

Classification of financial assets at amortised cost, at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI) or at fair value through profit or loss (FVPL) is mainly based on the business model assessment and the solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI-) test.

A financial asset is classified into a measurement category at inception and is reclassified only in rare circumstances.

The classification and measurement decision tree supports a structured approach to determine whether cash flows are generated from holding the financial assets, selling the financial assets or both (business model assessment). Then the SPPI check examines all essential instrument features that are relevant for classification.

The available classification and measurement classifications are:

  • Financial assets valued at amortised costs,
  • Financial
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