IFRS 2 Fair value of equity instruments granted

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IFRS 2 Fair value of equity instruments granted – Share-based payment transactions with employees are measured with reference to the fair value of the equity instruments granted (IFRS 2.11).

The fair value of a equity instrument granted is determined as follows (IFRS 2.16-17):

  • If market prices are available for the actual equity instruments granted – i.e. shares or share options with the same terms and conditions – then the estimate of fair value is based on these market prices. IFRS 2 Fair value of equity instruments granted
  • If market prices are not available for the equity instruments granted, then the fair value of equity instruments granted is estimated using a valuation technique.

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Regulated interest rates

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Regulated interest rates – IFRS 9 recognises that in some jurisdictions, the government or a regulatory authority sets interest rates – e.g. as part of a broad macro-economic policy, or to encourage entities to invest in a particular sector of the economy. In some of these cases, the objective of the time value of money element is not to provide consideration for only the passage of time. [IFRS 9 B4.1.9E]

  • In spite of the general requirements for the modified time value of money, a regulated interest rate is considered to be a proxy for the time value of money if it:
  • provides consideration that is broadly consistent with the passage of time; and Regulated interest
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Hyperinflation in Argentina

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Hyperinflation in Argentina – Argentina is now (October 2019) considered to be a hyperinflationary economy. IAS 29 – Financial Reporting in Hyperinflationary Economies is therefore applicable to entities whose functional currency is the Argentine peso.

Assessment of the situation

Hyperinflation in Argentina IAS 29 sets out a number of quantitative and qualitative characteristics for the purpose of assessing whether an economy is hyperinflationary (IAS 29 3), including:

  • the general population prefers to keep its wealth in non-monetary assets or in a relatively stable foreign currency (e.g., the US dollar or the euro);
  • transactions are conducted in terms of a relatively stable foreign currency;
  • sales and purchases on credit take place at prices that compensate for the expected loss
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Disclosures in First IFRS Financial statements

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Disclosures in First IFRS Financial statements – A first-time adopter must apply all of the presentation and disclosure requirements in IFRSs. IFRS Reference: [IFRS 1, paras 20, 23 – 27A, 29 – 31B]

The first-time adopter must also explain how the transition from previous GAAP to IFRSs affected its reported financial position, financial performance and cash flows. As a result, an entity’s first IFRS financial statements must include the following reconciliations:

Note that the dates presented are examples for an entity with a calendar year end (adopting IFRS in 20X3) that presents only one comparative period.

Nature of disclosure

Comparative year ended December 31, 20×2

Opening as at January 1, 20×2

Reconciliation of equity as at:

  • the
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Accounting Policies to First IFRS Financial statements

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Accounting Policies to First IFRS Financial statements – An entity must use the same accounting policies in its opening IFRS statement of financial position and throughout all periods presented in its first IFRS financial statements. Those accounting policies must comply with each IFRSs effective at the end of its first IFRS reporting period, unless there is a mandatory exception to retrospective application or an optional exemption from the requirements of IFRSs.

[IFRS 1, paras 7 – 9] Accounting Policies to First IFRS Financial statements

Note that:

  • An entity may apply a new IFRS that is not yet mandatory if that IFRSs permits early application.
  • The transitional provisions in IFRSs do not apply to a first-time adopter’s transition to IFRSs.

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Presentation Insurance contracts

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Presentation Insurance contracts Presentation Insurance contracts – IFRS 17 specifies minimum amounts of information that need to be presented on the face of the statement of financial position and statement of financial performance. These are supplemented by disclosures to explain the amounts recognized on the face of the primary financial statements (see ‘Disclosure of Insurance contracts’).

IFRS 17 requires separate presentation of amounts relating to insurance contracts issued and reinsurance contracts held in the primary statements. There is nothing to prevent an entity from providing further sub-analysis of the required line items (which may make the relationship of the reconciliations to the face of the statement of financial position more understandable).

Indeed, IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements requires presentation Read more

General model of measurement of insurance contracts

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General model of measurement of insurance contracts – Insurance contracts may be highly complex bundles of interdependent rights and obligations and combine features of a financial instrument and features of a service contract. As a result, insurance contracts can provide their issuers with different sources of income – e.g. underwriting profit, fees from asset management services and financial income from spread business (when insurers earn a margin on invested assets) – often all within the same contract. [IFRS 17 IN5, IFRS 17 BC18]

The general measurement model introduced by IFRS 17 provides a comprehensive and coherent framework that provides information reflecting the many different features of insurance contracts and the ways in which the issuers of insurance … Read more

Example of hyperinflation accounting

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Example of hyperinflation accounting – Here is an example of hyperinflation accounting (change from functional currency (ARS) to presentation currency (USD)) and a limited disclosure on hedge accounting for a net investment in a foreign operation (Third-party financing of EUR operations in EUR-denominated notes).

  • Hyperinflation accounting

(Source: www.ft.com, ‘American companies count cost of Argentina inflation’ by Alistair Gray in New York and Benedict Mander in Buenos Aires APRIL 7, 2019)

‘Rampant inflation in Argentina has forced US companies to stop using the peso to account for their business in the country, triggering multimillion-dollar foreign exchange losses. Example of hyperinflation accounting

US accounting rules are requiring American businesses to use the dollar as their “functional currency” in

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Leases capitalisation on the balance sheet

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Summary Leases capitalisation on the balance sheet

IFRS 16 includes a single accounting model for all leases by lessees.

The main implications of the new standard on current practice for lessees include:

  • No more operating leases under IFRS 16 (subject to the exceptions described below)
  • All leases (subject to the exceptions described below) will be capitalised on the balance sheet by recognising a ‘right-of-use’ asset and a lease liability for the present value of the obligation
  • No rental expense! i.e. no more straight-line expenses for operating lease costs. All leases will incur a front-end loaded expense, comprising depreciation on the right-of-use asset, and interest on the lease liability
  • When initially measuring the right-of-use asset and a lease
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