Intangible assets | Annualreporting.info

How is goodwill different from other intangible assets?

An asset, which has no physical existence such as corporate intellectual properties (patents, trademarks, business methodologies and copyrights), trademarks, patents, software, goodwill and brand recognition are known to be an “Intangible asset”.

Types of Intangible assets and their recognition How is goodwill different from other intangible assets?

Intangible assets of the business are either acquired through a business combination or are developed internally. In most of the cases if the asset is acquired through an acquisition or a merger than it is recorded at its fair value while if the assets are generated internally than it is accounted for according to the amount of the costs incurred during the development phase of the asset.

Under IFRS the … Read more

Customer relationships valuation

References:

Customer contracts and the related customer relationships
Non-contractual customer relationships
Order or production backlog

Introduction

Here a valuation model is presented to value customer contracts and the related customer relationship and the non-contractual customer relationships, as per IFRS 3 Business Combinations.

What are the inputs?

Revenue – represents revenue from existing customer relationships for existing products. Includes contractual and non-contractual relationships (even those without current backlog or commitments). Separate valuation of a backlog revenue intangible asset can be considered if and when such backlog exists.… Read more

Asset-based business valuations

The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach.

When properly applied using consistent valuation variables, all asset-based business valuation approach methods should conclude approximately the same value for the subject business enterprise.

Additionally, when properly applied using consistent valuation variables, all asset-based business valuation approach methods may be used to conclude any of the following ownership interests:

  1. Total business enterprise (i.e., total long-term debt and total ownersequity)
  2. Total business assets (i.e., total subject entity tangible and intangible assets)
  3. Total business ownersequity (e.g., all classes of equity)
  4. A single class of owners’ equity (e.g., total common stock)
  5. A specific
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Identify and separate Intangible assets

The acquirer recognises, separately from goodwill, the identifiable intangible assets acquired in a business combination. An intangible asset is identifiable if it meets either the separability criterion or the contractual-legal criterion. Identify and separate Intangible assets Identify and separate Intangible assets

An intangible asset that meets the contractual-legal criterion is identifiable even if the asset is not transferable or separable from the acquiree or from other rights and obligations. For example:… Read more

Business Combinations and Goodwill

Introduction Business Combinations and Goodwill

19.1 Business Combinations and Goodwill applies to accounting for business combinations. It provides guidance on identifying the acquirer, measuring the cost of the business combination and allocating that cost to the assets acquired and liabilities and provisions for contingent liabilities assumed. It also addresses accounting for goodwill both at the time of a business combination and subsequently.

Business Combinations and Goodwill – Exceptions

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Change in accounting principles

There is an underlying presumption that an accounting principle, once adopted, should not be changed for similar events and transactions. A change in principle may be caused by new events, changing conditions, or additional information or experience.

There are two circumstances when a company is required to change an accounting policy. These are:

  • If the change is required by a Standard or an Interpretation; or Change in accounting principles
  • If the change results in the financial statements providing more reliable and relevant information about the effects of transactions (or other events).

IAS 8 19 (b) requires retrospective application (i.e., the application of a different accounting method to previous years as if that new method had always been used) to prior Read more