Best intro to accounting for cryptocurrencies in 1 view

Best intro to accounting for cryptocurrencies

the basics provides guidance on some of the basic issues encountered in accounting for cryptocurrencies, focussing on the accounting for the holder.

The popularity of cryptocurrencies has soared in recent years, yet they do not fit easily within IFRS’ financial reporting structure.

For example, an approach of accounting for holdings of cryptocurrencies at fair value through profit or loss may seem intuitive but is incompatible with the requirements of IFRS in most circumstances. Here the acceptable methods of accounting for holdings in cryptocurrencies are discussed while touching upon other issues that may be encountered.

Relevant IFRS

IAS 38 Intangible AssetsIAS 2 InventoriesIFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement

What is a cryptocurrency?

Cryptocurrency is digital or ‘virtual’ money, which uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional currency units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptography itself describes the process by which codes are written or generated to allow information to be kept secret.

In contrast to traditional forms of money which are controlled using centralised banking systems, cryptocurrencies use decentralised control. The decentralised control of a cryptocurrency works through a ‘blockchain’, which is a public transaction database, functioning as a distributed ledger.

This has advantages in that two parties can transact with each other directly without the need for an intermediary, saving time and cost.

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Related IFRS posts

IFRS 5 Non-current assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations

 

IFRS 5 Non-current assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations

at a glance – here it is the ultimate summary:

Source: https://www.bdo.global/en-gb/services/audit-assurance/ifrs/ifrs-at-a-glance

Definitions
Cash-generating unit – The smallest identifiable group of assets that generates cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets. Discontinued operation – A component of an entity that either has been disposed of or is classified as held for sale and either:
  • Represents a separate major line of business or geographical area
  • Is part of a single co-ordinated plan to dispose of a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations
  • Is a subsidiary acquired exclusively with a view to resale.
SCOPE
  • Applies to all
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IAS 36 Other impairment issues

IAS 36 Other impairment issues – When looking at the step-by-step IAS 36 impairment approach it comes down to the following broadly organised steps: IAS 36 How Impairment test

  • What?? – Determining the scope and structure of the impairment review, explained here,
  • If and when? – Determining if and when a quantitative impairment test is necessary, explained here,
  • IAS 36 How Impairment test or understanding the mechanics of the impairment test and how to recognise or reverse any impairment loss, if necessary, which is explained here

IAS 36 Other impairment issues discusses other common application issues encountered when applying IAS 36, including those related to:

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IAS 36 Best brilliant impairment of telecom assets

IAS 36 Best brilliant impairment of telecom assets sets out the procedures that an entity should follow to ensure that it carries its assets at no more than thIAS 36 Best brilliant impairment of telecom assetseir recoverable amount. Recoverable amount is the higher of the amount to be realised through using or selling the asset.

Where the carrying amount exceeds the recoverable amount, the asset is impaired and an impairment loss must be recognised.

The standard details the circumstances when an impairment loss should be reversed, and also sets out required disclosures for impaired assets, impairment losses, reversals of impairment losses as well as key estimates and assumptions used in measuring the recoverable amounts of cash-generating units (CGUs) that contain goodwill or intangible assets with indefinite … Read more

11 Best fair value measurements under IFRS 13

11 Best fair value measurements under IFRS 13 – Several IFRS standards provide guidance regarding the scope and application of for assets and liabilities. Here they are from 1 to 11…….

1 Investments in associates and joint ventures

Investments held by venture capital organizations and the like are exempt from IAS 28’s requirements … Read more

Impairment of right-of-use assets

Impairment of right-of-use assets explains the lease assets now on the balance sheet and as a result also susceptible of impairment risks to be accounted for. Impairment of right-of-use assets

Right-of-use asset is an asset that represents a lessee’s right to use an underlying asset for the lease term. Impairment of right-of-use assets

Right-of-use

A contract conveys the right to control the use of an identified asset if the customer has both the right to obtain substantially all of the economic benefits from use of the identified asset and the right to direct the use of the identified asset throughout the period of use/lease. Impairment of right-of-use assets

The right-of-use asset is depreciated over the lease term

  • The carrying
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3 powerful capital maintenance concepts

3 powerful capital maintenance concepts – There are three (or two a matter of definition) concepts of capital: a financial concept of capital (nominal maintenance and purchasing power maintenance) and a physical concept of capital. Under the financial concept, capital is defined as the net assets or equity of the enterprise, while under the physical concept, capital is defined as the productive capacity of the enterprise expressed in some physical units of measurement, as for example units of output per day.

The selection of the appropriate concept of capital by an enterprise should be based on the needs of the users of its financial statements. So, the financial concept of capital should be and mostly is used by the financial … Read more

Consolidated financial statements

The financial statements of a group in which the assets, liabilities, equity, income, expenses and cash flows of the parent and its subsidiaries are presented as those of a single economic entity. The detailed ‘mechanics’ of the consolidation process vary from one group to another, depending on the group’s structure, history and financial reporting systems. IFRS 10 and much of the literature on consolidation are based on a traditional approach to consolidation under which the financial statements (or, more commonly in practice, group ‘reporting packs’) of group entities are aggregated and then adjusted on each reporting date.

Financing activities

Financing activities - Activities that result in changes in the size and composition of the contributed capital and borrowings of the entity.

Acquisition of investment properties

Acquisition of investment properties – When should a purchase of investment property (or properties) be accounted for as a business combination, and when as a simple asset purchase? This is an important issue because the IFRS accounting requirements for a business combination are very different from asset purchases. Acquisition of investment properties

The purchase of investment property (or properties) is a business combination if the acquired set of assets and activities meets IFRS 3’s definition of a business

(IFRS 3 Appendix A and supporting guidance). That guidance explains that a business consists of ‘inputs’ and ‘processes’ applied to those inputs that together have the ability to create ‘outputs’ (IFRS 3.B7). Determining whether a purchase of investment … Read more