IFRS 10 Special control approach

IFRS 10 Special control approach

– determines which entities are consolidated in a parent’s financial statements and therefore affects a group’s reported results, cash flows and financial position – and the activities that are ‘on’ and ‘off’ the group’s balance sheet. Under IFRS, this control assessment is accounted for in accordance with IFRS 10 ‘Consolidated financial statements’.

Some of the challenges of applying the IFRS 10 Special control approach include:

  • identifying the investee’s returns, which in turn involves identifying its assets and liabilities. This may appear straightforward but complications arise when the legal ownership of assets diverges from the accounting depiction (for example, in financial asset transfers that ‘fail’ de-recognition, and in finance leases). In general, the assessment of the investee’s assets and returns should be consistent with the accounting depiction in accordance with IFRS
  • it may not always be clear whether contracts and other arrangements between an investor and an investee
    • create rights or exposure to a variable return from the investee’s performance for the investor; or
    • transfer risk or variability from the investor to the investee IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the relevant activities of an SPE may not be obvious, especially when its activities have been narrowly specified in its purpose and design IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the rights to direct those activities might also be difficult to identify, because for example, they arise only in particular circumstances or from contracts that are outside the legal boundary of the SPE (but closely related to its activities).

IFRS 10 Special control approach sets out requirements for how to apply the control principle in less straight forward circumstances, which are detailed below:  IFRS 10 Special control approach

  • when voting rights or similar rights give an investor power, including situations where the investor holds less than a majority of voting rights and in circumstances involving potential voting rights
  • when an investee is designed so that voting rights are not the dominant factor in deciding who controls the investee, such as when any voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and the relevant activities are directed by means of contractual arrangements IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • involving agency relationships IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • when the investor has control only over specified assets of an investee
  • franchises. IFRS 10 Special control approach

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IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements quick overview

IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements quick overview provides the fastest overview on financial reporting by entities that have an interest in arrangements that are bound by a contractual arrangement providing two or more parties joint control.

OBJECTIVE

To establish principles for financial reporting by entities that have an interest in arrangements that are controlled jointly (i.e. joint arrangements)

IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements quick overview

IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements quick overview

IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements quick overview

SCOPE

IFRS 11 applies to all entities that are a party to a joint arrangement

DEFINITIONS

Joint arrangement

Joint control

Joint operationJoint operator

Joint ventureJoint venturer

Party to a joint arrangement

Separate vehicle

JOINT ARRANGEMENT

A joint arrangement is an arrangement

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High level overview IFRS 3 Business Combinations

HIGH LEVEL OVERVIEW IFRS 3 BUSINESS COMBINATIONS

A summary on one page and more detail for reference

IFRS 3

(Source https://www.bdo.global/en-gb/services/audit-assurance/ifrs/ifrs-at-a-glance)

ScopeHigh level overview IFRS 3 Business Combinations

IFRS 3 does not apply to:

  • The accounting for the formation of a joint arrangement in the financial statements of the joint arrangement itself.
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    So, what exactly is a joint venture?

    what exactly is a joint venture? – Joint ventures are economic arrangements between two or more parties where key strategic decisions are made unanimously by the entities (the “venturers”) that share control. Key strategic decisions would include decisions that significantly impact sales and purchases of goods and services; research and development of new products; acquisitions and disposals; and the funding structure of the venture.

    Joint ventures may appear in incorporated or unincorporated form (i.e. a joint venture need not result in the creation of a separate legal entity). “Strategic alliances” in which companies agree to work together to promote each other’s products or services may also be considered joint ventures.

    How are joint ventures classified and accounted for? So, what

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    IFRS 16 Leases and joint arrangements

    IFRS 16 Leases and joint arrangements – Entities often enter into joint arrangements with other entities for certain activities (e.g., exploration of oil and gas fields, development of pharmaceutical products).

    A contract for the use of an asset by a joint arrangement might be entered into in a number of different ways, including:

    1. Directly by the joint arrangement, if the joint arrangement has its own legal identity IFRS 16 Leases and joint arrangements
    2. By each of the parties to the joint arrangement (i.e., the lead operator and the other parties, commonly referred to as the non-operators) individually signing the same arrangementIFRS 16 Leases and joint arrangements
    3. By one or more of the parties to the joint arrangement on behalf of the joint arrangement. Generally, this
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    Disclosures material joint operations

    Disclosures material joint operations – Unlike joint ventures, IFRS 12 requires only limited quantitative disclosures for joint operations, including information about significant judgments and assumptions made in determining the classification of a joint arrangement that is structured through a separate entity. [IFRS 12 7 (c) and IFRS 12 21 (a)] Disclosures material joint operations

    The classification of joint arrangements is discussed here. Disclosures material joint operations

    Based on IFRS 12 7 (c), IFRS 12 21 (a), the disclosures are made like in this illustrative example: Disclosures material joint operations

    Disclosures material joint operations

    BHP Annual Report 2018 [page 159] – Accounting policies:

    Joint arrangements: The Group undertakes a number of business activities through joint arrangements, which exist when … Read more

    Joint Arrangements

    IFRS 11 describes the accounting for joint arrangements. The investor will be required to either apply the equity method of accounting or recognize, on a line-by-line basis, its share of the underlying assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. The accounting treatment required will depend on the substance of the arrangement and the nature of the investor’s interest in it. The option to apply proportionate consolidation has been removed. IFRS 11 supersedes the requirements relating to joint ventures in IAS 31 and SIC 13.

    A joint arrangement is an arrangement of which two or more parties have joint control and the following characteristics are present:

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    Accounting Policies to First IFRS FS

    Accounting Policies to First IFRS FS – An entity must use the same accounting policies in its opening IFRS statement of financial position and throughout all periods presented in its first IFRS financial statements. Those accounting policies must comply with each IFRSs effective at the end of its first IFRS reporting period, unless there is a mandatory exception to retrospective application or an optional exemption from the requirements of IFRSs.

    [IFRS 1, paras 7 – 9]Accounting Policies to First IFRS FS

    Note that:

    • An entity may apply a new IFRS that is not yet mandatory if that IFRSs permits early application.
    • The transitional provisions in IFRSs do not apply to a first-time adopter’s transition to IFRSs.

    Mandatory Exceptions to Retrospective Application and Optional Exemptions from Read more