Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

– provides a narrative providing guidance on users of financial statements’ needs to present financial disclosures in the notes to the financial statements grouped in more logical orders. But there is and never will be a one-size fits all.

Here it has been decided to separately disclose financial assets and liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities, because of the distinct different nature of these classes of assets and liabilities and the resulting different types of disclosures, risks and tabulations.

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities guidance

Disclosing financial assets and liabilities (financial instruments) in one note

Users of financial reports have indicated that they would like to be able to quickly access all of the information about the entity’s financial assets and liabilities in one location in the financial report. The notes are therefore structured such that financial items and non-financial items are discussed separately. However, this is not a mandatory requirement in the accounting standards.

Accounting policies, estimates and judgements

For readers of Financial Statements it is helpful if information about accounting policies that are specific to the entityDisclosure financial assets and liabilitiesand about significant estimates and judgements is disclosed with the relevant line items, rather than in separate notes. However, this format is also not mandatory. For general commentary regarding the disclosures of accounting policies refer to note 25. Commentary about the disclosure of significant estimates and judgements is provided in note 11.

Scope of accounting standard for disclosure of financial instruments

­

IFRS 7 does not apply to the following items as they are not financial instruments as defined in paragraph 11 of IAS 32:

  1. prepayments made (right to receive future good or service, not cash or a financial asset)
  2. tax receivables and payables and similar items (statutory rights or obligations, not contractual), or
  3. contract liabilities (obligation to deliver good or service, not cash or financial asset).

While contract assets are also not financial assets, they are explicitly included in the scope of IFRS 7 for the purpose of the credit risk disclosures. Liabilities for sales returns and volume discounts (see note 7(f)) may be considered financial liabilities on the basis that they require payments to the customer. However, they should be excluded from financial liabilities if the arrangement is executory. the Reporting entity Plc determined this to be the case. [IFRS 7.5A]

Classification of preference shares

Preference shares must be analysed carefully to determine if they contain features that cause the instrument not to meet the definition of an equity instrument. If such shares meet the definition of equity, the entity may elect to carry them at FVOCI without recycling to profit or loss if not held for trading.

Read more

IFRS 3 Identify a business

IFRS 3 Identify a business – An entity shall determine whether a transaction or other event is a business combination by applying the definition in IFRS 3, which requires that the assets acquired and liabilities assumed constitute a business. If the assets acquired are not a business, the reporting entity shall account for the transaction or other event as an asset acquisitionSee also the accounting treatment acquisition of a business or asset(s) 

Guidance on identifying a business combination and the definition of a business are as follows:

The definition of a business: An integrated set of activities and assets that is capable of being conducted and managed for the purpose of providing goods or services to customers, generating investment income (such as dividends or interest) or generating other income from ordinary activities.

Identifying a business combination [IFRS 3 B5 – B6] IFRS 3 Identify a business

IFRS 3 defines a business combination as a transaction or other event in which an acquirer obtains control of one or more businesses. An acquirer might obtain control of an acquiree in a variety IFRS 3 Identify a businessof ways, for example:

  1. by transferring cash, cash equivalents or other assets (including net assets that constitute a business);
  2. by incurring liabilities; IFRS 3 Identify a business
  3. by issuing equity interests; IFRS 3 Identify a business
  4. by providing more than one type of consideration; or
  5. without transferring consideration, including by contract alone.

A business combination may be structured in a variety of ways for legal, taxation or other reasons, which include but are not limited to:

  1. one or more businesses become subsidiaries of an acquirer or the net assets of one or more businesses are legally merged into the acquirer;
  2. one combining entity transfers its net assets, or its owners transfer their equity interests, to another combining entity or its owners;
  3. all of the combining entities transfer their net assets, or the owners of those entities transfer their equity interests, to a newly formed entity (sometimes referred to as a roll-up or put-together transaction); or
  4. a group of former owners of one of the combining entities obtains control of the combined entity.

Read more

Revaluation model

The revaluation model. An asset will be carried at its fair value at the revaluation date less subsequent depreciation and/or impairment recordings

Sale and leaseback accounting

Sale and leaseback accounting – IFRS 16 makes significant changes to sale and leaseback accounting. A sale and leaseback transaction is one where an entity (the -lessee) transfers an asset to another entity (the -lessor) for consideration and leases that asset back from the -lessor.

A sale and leaseback transaction is a popular way for entities to secure long-term financing from substantial property, plant and equipment assets such as land and buildings. IAS 17 covered the accounting for … Read more

Information to be presented either in the statement of financial position or in the notes

Information to be presented either in the statement of financial position or in the notes – Here is a list of items that a reporting entity can either decide to include in the financial position/balance sheet or in the notes. Neither is wrong, the financial statement should provide useful information as a whole. An entity shall disclose, either in the statement of financial position or in the notes, the following subclassifications of the line items presented:

  1. property, plant and equipment in classifications appropriate to the entity;
  2. trade and other receivables showing separately amounts due from related parties, amounts due from other parties, and receivables arising from accrued income not yet billed;
  3. inventories, showing separately amounts of inventories:
    1. held for
Read more

Investment property

Investment property is property (land or a building—or part of a building—or both) held (by the owner or by the lessee as a right-of-use asset) to earn rentals or for capital appreciation

Property plant and equipment

Property plant and equipment are tangible items that are held for use in many different ways and are expected to be used during more than one period.

First IFRS financial statements

The first annual financial statements in which an entity adopts International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs), by an explicit and unreserved statement of compliance with IFRSs. IFRS 1 sets out detailed rules that entities must follow when adopting IFRS for the first time. The standard also sets out a number of exemptions that may be applied when adopting IFRS. If an entity wishes to apply either of these exemptions a full audit trail must be produced to outline the assessment and sufficient evidence must be provided to evidence that the application of the exemption is appropriate.