Determining a leases discount rate

Determining a leases discount rate

The definition of the lessee’s incremental borrowing rate states that the rate should represent what the lessee ‘would have to pay to borrow over a similar term and with similar security, the funds necessary to obtain an asset of similar value to the right-of-use asset in a similar economic environment.’ In applying the concept of ‘similar security’, a lessee uses the right-of-use asset granted by the lease and not the fair value of the underlying asset.

This is because the rate should represent the amount that would be charged to acquire an asset of similar value for a similar period. For example, in determining the incremental borrowing rate on a 5 year lease of a property, the security for the portion of the asset being leased (i.e. the 5 year portion of its useful life) would be likely to vary significantly from the outright ownership of the property, as outright ownership would confer rights over a period of time that would typically be significantly greater than the 5-year right-of-use asset contained in the lease.

In practice, judgement may be needed to estimate an incremental borrowing rate in the context of a right-of-use asset, especially when the value of the underlying asset differs significantly from the value of the right-of-use asset.

An entity’s weighted-average cost of capital (‘WACC’) is not appropriate to use as a proxy for the incremental borrowing rate because it is not representative of the rate an entity would pay on borrowings. WACC incorporates the cost of equity-based capital, which is unsecured and ranks behind other creditors and will therefore be a higher rate than that paid on borrowings.

Read more

M and A

M and A or Mergers and Acquisitions

in IFRS language Business Combinations.

1 Identifying a business combination

IFRS 3 refers to a ‘business combination’ rather than more commonly used phrases such as takeover, acquisition or merger because the objective is to encompass all the transactions in which an acquirer obtains control over an acquiree no matter how the transaction is structured. A business combination is defined as a transaction or other event in which an acquirer (an investor entity) obtains control of one or more businesses.

An entity’s purchase of a controlling interest in another unrelated operating entity will usually be a business combination (see Simple case – Straightforward business combination below). However, a business combination (M and A) may be structured, and an entity may obtain control of that structure, in a variety of ways.

Examples of business combinations structurings

Examples of ways an entity may obtain control

A business becomes the subsidiary of an acquirer

The entity transfers cash, cash equivalents or other assets(including net assets that constitute a business)

Net assets of one or more businesses are legally merged with an acquirer

The entity incurs liabilities

One combining entity transfers its net assets, or its owners transfer their equity interests, to another combining entity or its owners

The entity issues shares

The entity transfers more than one type of consideration, or

Two or more entities transfer their net assets, or the owners of those entities transfer their equity interests to a newly created entity, which in exchange issues shares, or

The entity does not transfer consideration and obtains control for example by contract alone Some examples of this:

  • ‘dual listed companies’ or ‘stapled entity structures’
  • acquiree repurchases a sufficient number of its own shares for an existing shareholder to obtain control
  • a condition in the shareholder agreement that prevents the majority shareholder exercising control of the entity has expired, or
  • a call option over a controlling interest that becomes exercisable.

A group of former owners of one of the combining entities obtains control of the combined entity, i.e. former owners, as a group, retain control of the entity they previously owned.

Therefore, identifying a business combination transaction requires the determination of whether:

  • what is acquired constitutes a ‘business’ as defined in IFRS3, and
  • control has been obtained.

Read more

Narrative reporting the right way

Narrative reporting

– whether in the form of an Operating and Financial Review (OFR), Management Discussion and Analysis (MD&A), a Business Review or other management commentary – is vital to corporate transparency. Key performance indicators (KPIs), both financial and non-financial, are an important component of the information needed to explain a company’s progress towards its stated goals, for all of these types of narrative reporting.

But despite this fact, KPIs are not well understood. What makes a performance indicator “key”? What type of information should be provided for each indicator? And how can it best be presented to provide effective narrative business reporting?

Setting the stage – two quotes

Although narrative reporting requirements remain fluid, reporting on KPIs is here to stay. I welcome any publication as a valuable contribution to helping companies choose which KPIs to report and what information will provide investors with a real understanding of corporate performance. Using management’s own measures of success really helps deepen investors’ understanding of progress and movement in business. Whether contextual, financial or non-financial, these data points make the trends in the business transparent and help keep management accountable. The illustrations of good practice reporting on KPIs shown here bring alive what is required in a practical and effective way.

KPIs – a critical component

Regulatory environment

The specific requirements for narrative reporting have been a point of debate for several years now. However one certainty remains: the requirement to report financial and non-financial key performance indicators.

Read more

Fair value through profit or loss

Financial assets measured at fair value through profit or loss 2. This is part of the classification of financial assets, representing the remaining or designated class of financial assets.

Reporting entity

A reporting entity can be a single entity or a portion of an entity or can comprise more than one entity. A reporting entity is not necessarily a legal entity. Sometimes one entity (parent) has control over another entity (subsidiary). If a reporting entity comprises both the parent and its subsidiaries, the reporting entity's financial statements are referred to as 'consolidated financial statements'. If a reporting entity is the parent alone, the reporting entity's financial statements are referred to as 'unconsolidated financial statements'.

IAS 34 Interim financial statements

IAS 34 Interim financial statements provide all there is to know for producing Interim financial statements, what, where, when and what is in them.

Objective

IAS 34 prescribes the guidelines for an entity regarding the preparation of interim financial statements by providing information about the minimum contents of interim financial reports along with the recognition and measurement principles for such financial reports. These interim financial reports will provide the most recent activities, circumstances and financial affairs of the reporting entity

Scope

IAS 34 does not define, which entity is required to publish the interim financial reports, the time period after the end of interim period within which these financial reports should be published and how frequently these should be published.Read more

Stewardship and agency theory

Stewardship and agency theory – This part is a more detailed explanation of the revised Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting 2018 (Conceptual Framework) issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) regarding Control as part of chapter 4 – The Elements of Financial Statements, section 4.25 on one party (a principal) engaging another party (an agent) to act on behalf of, and for the benefit of, the principal.

The view of ‘stewardship’ given in the current Conceptual Framework mentions that management are accountable to the entity’s capital providers for the custody and safekeeping of the entity’s economic resources and for their efficient and profitable use, including protecting them from unfavorable economic effects such as inflation and technological changes. Management … Read more

Measurement under IFRS

Measurement under IFRS is still diverse and sometimes inconsistent. Here is a summary of current measurement practices in IFRS and areas for improvement.

The standards for which the IASB is responsible – International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) – are one collection of financial reporting practices. They are increasingly important because of the growing number of companies around the world (especially listed companies) that are required to comply with them, and the growing number of countries that model their own more general financial reporting requirements on them. Measurement under IFRS

IFRS incorporates and builds on the accumulated, often inconsistent practical solutions devised by national standard-setters to deal with financial reporting problems that have emerged over many years, solutions which are in Read more