Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution – The best read

Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution

Category description – Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution includes emissions that occur in the reporting year from transportation and distribution of sold products in vehicles and facilities not owned or controlled by the reporting company.

Overview – Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution

Reporting on Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution involves a comprehensive analysis of the logistical processes and operations involved in transporting goods from production facilities to end consumers. Here’s an executive overview:

  1. Scope and Definition: Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution encompasses the movement of goods from manufacturing plants or warehouses to various distribution centers, retailers, or directly to customers. It involves multiple modes of transportation such as road, rail, sea, and air, as well as associated warehousing and distribution activities.
  2. Key Components:
    • Transportation Modes: Assess the utilization of different transportation modes and their efficiency in terms of cost, speed, and reliability.
    • Distribution Network: Evaluate the design and optimization of distribution networks to ensure timely delivery and minimize costs.
    • Warehousing: Analyze the efficiency of warehousing operations in terms of inventory management, storage capacity, and order fulfillment.
    • Last-Mile Delivery: Focus on the final stage of delivery to customers, addressing challenges and strategies for improving efficiency and customer satisfaction.
  3. Performance Metrics:
    • On-Time Delivery: Measure the percentage of deliveries made according to schedule to assess reliability.
    • Transit Time: Evaluate the average time taken for goods to move through the transportation and distribution network.
    • Cost per Unit: Analyze the cost incurred per unit of goods transported, considering transportation, warehousing, and handling expenses.Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution
    • Inventory Turnover: Assess the rate at which inventory is sold and replaced, indicating efficiency in managing stock levels.
  4. Challenges and Opportunities:
    • Infrastructure: Address challenges related to transportation infrastructure, such as road congestion, port capacity, and airport efficiency.
    • Sustainability: Explore opportunities for reducing the environmental impact of transportation and distribution operations through alternative fuels, route optimization, and packaging innovations.
    • Technology Integration: Highlight the role of technology in optimizing logistics processes, including the use of IoT devices, predictive analytics, and automation to improve efficiency and visibility across the supply chain.
  5. Regulatory and Compliance:
    • Compliance with Regulations: Ensure adherence to regulations governing transportation safety, labor practices, environmental standards, and customs procedures.
    • Trade Policies: Monitor changes in trade policies and tariffs that may impact transportation costs, lead times, and supply chain resilience.
  6. Strategic Recommendations:
    • Network Optimization: Identify opportunities to streamline the transportation and distribution network to reduce costs and improve service levels.
    • Technology Investment: Recommend investments in transportation management systems (TMS), warehouse management systems (WMS), and tracking technologies to enhance visibility and control.
    • Collaboration: Encourage collaboration with transportation partners and suppliers to leverage economies of scale, share resources, and mitigate risks.
  7. Future Outlook:
    • Market Trends: Anticipate emerging trends such as e-commerce growth, omnichannel distribution, and the adoption of electric and autonomous vehicles.
    • Resilience Planning: Prepare for disruptions such as natural disasters, geopolitical tensions, and pandemics by enhancing supply chain resilience and flexibility.

In summary, reporting on Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution involves assessing the efficiency, reliability, and sustainability of logistics operations while identifying opportunities for improvement and strategic investment to meet evolving market demands and challenges.

A worked example – EcoFoods Inc.

For this example, let’s consider a fictional company, “EcoFoods Inc.,” which produces organic food products and distributes them to retailers and customers across the country.

1. Scope and Definition:

EcoFoods Inc. operates a complex downstream transportation and distribution network, involving the movement of perishable organic food products from its manufacturing plants to various distribution centers and ultimately to retail outlets and consumers.

2. Key Components:

a. Transportation Modes:

EcoFoods utilizes a combination of refrigerated trucks for land transportation, as well as partnerships with shipping companies for sea transportation of bulk goods. Additionally, it employs air freight for urgent deliveries of high-value or time-sensitive products.

b. Distribution Network:

The company operates multiple distribution centers strategically located across the country to ensure efficient coverage and timely delivery. These distribution centers are equipped with temperature-controlled storage facilities to maintain the freshness and quality of the organic products.

c. Warehousing:

EcoFoods’ warehousing operations focus on efficient inventory management to minimize storage costs and ensure optimal stock levels. It employs barcode scanning and RFID technology for accurate tracking of inventory movement within its warehouses.

d. Last-Mile Delivery:

The company collaborates with local courier services and offers direct-to-customer delivery options, especially for online orders. It leverages route optimization software to ensure cost-effective and timely last-mile deliveries.

3. Performance Metrics:

a. On-Time Delivery:

EcoFoods consistently achieves an on-time delivery rate of over 95%, ensuring reliability for its retail partners and customers.

b. Transit Time:

The average transit time for products from manufacturing to retail shelves is maintained within industry standards, with continuous efforts to optimize routes and minimize lead times.

c. Cost per Unit:

The company closely monitors the cost per unit transported, including transportation, warehousing, and handling expenses, to ensure competitiveness while maintaining profitability.

d. Inventory Turnover:

EcoFoods maintains a healthy inventory turnover ratio by closely managing stock levels and implementing just-in-time inventory practices to minimize carrying costs.

4. Challenges and Opportunities:

a. Infrastructure:

EcoFoods faces challenges related to infrastructure constraints, particularly road congestion during peak hours and limited capacity at certain ports. The company explores alternative transportation routes and invests in infrastructure improvements where feasible.

b. Sustainability:

Recognizing the importance of sustainability, EcoFoods invests in hybrid and electric vehicles for its transportation fleet and implements packaging innovations to reduce environmental impact.

c. Technology Integration:

The company continuously invests in transportation management systems (TMS) and warehouse management systems (WMS) to optimize logistics operations and enhance visibility across the supply chain.

5. Regulatory and Compliance:

EcoFoods ensures compliance with food safety regulations, transportation safety standards, and environmental regulations governing its operations. It maintains robust procedures for quality control and traceability throughout the supply chain.

6. Strategic Recommendations:

a. Network Optimization:

Continuously assess and optimize the distribution network to minimize transportation costs and improve delivery efficiency, considering factors such as customer demand patterns and geographic distribution.

b. Technology Investment:

Further invest in advanced tracking and monitoring technologies to enhance real-time visibility into the supply chain, enabling proactive management of logistics operations and quicker response to disruptions.

c. Collaboration:

Strengthen partnerships with transportation providers, suppliers, and retailers to foster collaboration and streamline end-to-end supply chain processes.

7. Future Outlook:

a. Market Trends:

Anticipate and adapt to emerging market trends such as increasing demand for organic products, growth in e-commerce sales, and advancements in sustainable transportation technologies.

b. Resilience Planning:

Develop robust contingency plans to mitigate risks posed by potential disruptions, including natural disasters, geopolitical tensions, and supply chain disruptions.

By conducting comprehensive reporting and analysis across these key components, EcoFoods Inc. can effectively manage its downstream transportation and distribution operations, ensuring reliable and sustainable delivery of organic food products to its customers nationwide.

 

This category also includes emissions from retail and storage. Outbound transportation and distribution services that are purchased by the reporting company are excluded from category 9 and included in category 4 (Upstream transportation and distribution) because the reporting company purchases the service. Category 9 includes only emissions from transportation and distribution of products after the point of sale. See table 5.7 in the Scope 3 Standard for guidance in accounting for emissions from transportation and distribution in the value chain.

Emissions from downstream transportation and distribution can arise from transportation/storage of sold products in vehicles/facilities not owned by the reporting company. For example:

  • Warehouses and distribution centers
  • Retail facilities
  • Air transport
  • Rail transport
  • Road transport
  • Marine transport.

In this category, companies may include emissions from customers traveling to and from retail stores, which can be significant for companies that own or operate retail facilities. See chapter 5.6 of the Scope 3 Standard for guidance on the applicability of category 9 to final products and intermediate products sold by the reporting company. A reporting company’s scope 3 emissions from downstream transportation and distribution include the scope 1 and scope 2 emissions of transportation companies, distribution companies, retailers, and (optionally) customers.

If the reporting company sells an intermediate product, the company should report emissions from transportation and distribution of this intermediate product between the point of sale by the reporting company and either (1) the end consumer (if the eventual end use of the intermediate product is known) or (2) business customers (if the eventual end use of the intermediate product is unknown).

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Introduction

For each performance obligation satisfied over time, revenue must be recognised over time (IFRS 15.39-45 & IFRS 15.B14-B19). To do so, an entity shall measure the progress towards complete satisfaction of the performance obligation.

The measurement of progress has the objective of faithfully depicting an entity’s performance in transferring control of the goods or services promised to the customer (that is, the extent to which the performance obligation is satisfied).

An entity shall apply a single method of measuring progress for each performance obligation satisfied over time, and shall apply that method consistently to similar performance obligations and in similar circumstances.

At the end of each reporting period, an entity shall remeasure its progress towards complete satisfaction of each performance obligation satisfied over time.

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There are two main groups of elements:

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