How is goodwill different from other intangible assets?

An asset, which has no physical existence such as corporate intellectual properties (patents, trademarks, business methodologies and copyrights), trademarks, patents, software, goodwill and brand recognition are known to be an “Intangible asset”.

Types of Intangible assets and their recognition How is goodwill different from other intangible assets?

Intangible assets of the business are either acquired through a business combination or are developed internally. In most of the cases if the asset is acquired through an acquisition or a merger than it is recorded at its fair value while if the assets are generated internally than it is accounted for according to the amount of the costs incurred during the development phase of the asset.

Under IFRS the … Read more

Identify and separate Intangible assets

The acquirer recognises, separately from goodwill, the identifiable intangible assets acquired in a business combination. An intangible asset is identifiable if it meets either the separability criterion or the contractual-legal criterion. Identify and separate Intangible assets Identify and separate Intangible assets

An intangible asset that meets the contractual-legal criterion is identifiable even if the asset is not transferable or separable from the acquiree or from other rights and obligations. For example:… Read more

Product costs and period costs

A manufacturer’s product costs are the direct materials, direct labor, and manufacturing overhead used in making its products. (Manufacturing overhead is also referred to as factory overhead, indirect manufacturing costs, and burden.) The product costs of direct materials, direct labor, and manufacturing overhead are also costs, assigned to inventory (work-in-progress and finished goods) since these are the necessary costs of manufacturing the products.

Period costs are not a necessary part of the manufacturing process. As a result, period costs cannot be assigned to the products or to the cost of inventory. The period costs are usually associated with the selling function of the business or its general administration. The period costs are reported as expenses in the accounting period in … Read more

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI

IFRS 12 requires disclosures for each of an entity’s subsidiaries that have material non-controlling interests. Such disclosures assist users when estimating future profit or loss and cash flows (for example, by identifying the assets and liabilities that are held by subsidiaries, risk exposures of particular group entities, and those subsidiaries that have significant cash flows). The disclosures are as follows (new disclosures compared to the previous standard are in bold):

  • The subsidiary’s name
  • Its principal place of business (and country of incorporation, if different)
  • The proportion of ownership interests held by non-controlling interests
  • The proportion of voting rights held by noncontrolling interests, if different from the proportion of ownership interests held
  • The profit or loss allocated to non-controlling
Read more

IFRS 3 Identify a business

An entity shall determine whether a transaction or other event is a business combination by applying the definition in IFRS 3, which requires that the assets acquired and liabilities assumed constitute a business. If the assets acquired are not a business, the reporting entity shall account for the transaction or other event as an asset acquisitionSee also the accounting treatment acquisition of a business or asset(s) 

Guidance on identifying a business combination and the definition of a business are as follows:

The definition of a business: An integrated set of activities and assets that is capable of being conducted and managed for the purpose of providing goods or services to customers, generating investment income (such as … Read more

Borrowing costs

Scope

IAS 23 shall be applied in accounting for borrowing costs but it does not deal with the actual or imputed cost of equity, including preferred capital not classified as a liability.

The standard does not apply to borrowing costs directly attributable to acquisition, construction or production of:

  • a qualifying asset measured at fair value, e.g. a biological asset; or
  • inventories that are manufactured, or otherwise produced, in large quantities on a repetitive basis

IAS 23 decision tree – summary

How do you determine the amount of borrowing costs to be capitalised? The purpose of the following diagram is to summarise the main requirements of the standard and to illustrate the route which preparers need to Read more