Initial Coin Offering

Initial Coin Offering

An Initial Coin Offering (‘ICO’) is a form of fundraising that harnesses the power of cryptographic assets and blockchain-based trading. Similar to a crowdfunding campaign, an ICO allocates (issues or promises to issue) digital token(s) instead of shares to the parties that provided contributions for the development of the digital token. These ICO tokens typically do not represent an ownership interest in the entity, but they often provide access to a platform (if and when developed) and can often be traded on a crypto exchange. The population of ICO tokens in an ICO is generally set at a fixed amount.

It should be noted that ICOs might be subject to local securities law, and significant regulatory considerations might apply.

Each ICO is bespoke and will have unique terms and conditions. It is critical for issuers to review the whitepaper (A whitepaper is a concept paper authored by the developers of a platform, to set out an idea and overall value proposition to prospective investors. The whitepaper commonly outlines the development roadmap and key milestones that the development team expects to meet) or underlying documents accompanying the ICO token issuance, and to understand what exactly is being offered to investors/subscribers. In situations where rights and obligations arising from a whitepaper or their legal enforceability are unclear, legal advice might be needed, to determine the relevant terms.

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Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15 Complete and Exemplary Read

Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Barter transactions are the exchange of goods or services, in exchange for other goods or services

IFRS References: IFRS 15, IAS 16, IAS 38, IAS 40 Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

If an entity enters into a non-monetary exchange with a customer as part of its ordinary activities, then generally it applies the guidance on non-cash consideration in the IFRS 15 Revenue standard. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Non-monetary exchanges with non-customers do not give rise to revenue. If a non-monetary exchange of assets with a non-customer has commercial substance, then the transaction gives rise to a gain or loss. The cost of the asset acquired is generally the fair value of the asset surrendered, adjusted for any cash transferred. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Simple bartering involves no cost as this involves exchanging goods and/or services of the same value.

A barter exchange operates as a broker and bank in which each participating member has an account that is debited when purchasesNon-monetary transactions IFRS 15 are made, and credited when sales are made. Compared to one-to-one bartering, concerns over unequal exchanges are reduced in a barter exchange.

The exchange plays an important role because it provides the record-keeping, brokering expertise and monthly statements to each member. Commercial exchanges make money by charging a commission on each transaction on either the buy or sell side, or a combination of both. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

In general, one requirement remains in tact in non-monetary transactions, revenue cannot be recognised if the amount of revenue is not reliably measurable. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

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Stand-alone selling price

The best evidence of standalone selling price is the price that the entity charges for the good or service in a separate transaction with a customer. However, in many cases goods or services are sold exclusively as a package with other goods or services rather than on an individual basis (e.g. nonrenewable customer support).

IFRS vs US GAAP Revenue recognition

IFRS VS US GAAP Revenue recognition – In May 2014, the FASB and IASB issued their long-awaited converged standards on revenue recognition, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The revenue standards, as amended, were effective for calendar year-end companies in 2018 (2019 for non-public entities following US GAAP). The new model impacts revenue recognition under both US GAAP and IFRS, and, with the exception of a few discrete areas as summarized below, eliminates many of the existing differences in accounting for revenue between the two frameworks. Nearly all industries having contracts in the scope of the new standards are affected, and some will see pervasive changes.

Standards Reference 

US GAAP 

IFRS

ASC 340-40 Contracts with customers

ASC 606 Revenue from contracts

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1 Best Complete Read – Determine the transaction price

Determine the transaction price

This part relates to a complete explanation of IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers in respect of Engineering & Construction contracts, see Revenue from Engineering & Construction contracts. Determine the transaction price


The transaction price is the amount of consideration to which an entity expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties. This amount is meant to reflect the amount to which the entity has rights under the present contract, which may differ from the contractual price (e.g., if the entity intends to offer a price concession). The consideration promised in a contract may include fixed or variable amounts. … Read more

1 Best and Complete Read – Non-cash consideration

Non-cash consideration

Non-cash consideration received from a customer is measured at fair value.

If an entity cannot make a reasonable estimate of the fair value, then it refers to the estimated selling price of the promised goods or services (IFRS 15.66–67).

Estimates of the fair value of non-cash consideration may vary. Although this may be due to the occurrence or non-occurrence of a future event, it can also vary due to the form of the consideration – e.g. variations due to changes in the price per share if the non-cash consideration is an equity instrument (IFRS 15.68).

When the fair value of non-cash consideration varies for reasons other than the form of the consideration, those changes are Performancereflected in the transaction price and are subject to the guidance on constraining variable consideration (IFRS 15.69).

Non-cash consideration received from the customer to facilitate an entity’s fulfilment of the contract – e.g. materials or equipment – is accounted for if and when the entity obtains control of those contributed goods or services.

The standard does not provide specific guidance on the measurement date for non-cash consideration. It appears that an entity should apply judgement, based on the relevant facts and circumstances, to determine whether to measure non-cash consideration with reference to the date on which the contract is entered into, the date the non-cash consideration is received or the date the performance obligation is satisfied. Changes in the fair value of non-cash consideration after the measurement date are not included in the transaction price (IFRS 15.126, IE156–158, BC254A–BC254G).

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