IFRS 10 Special control approach

IFRS 10 Special control approach

– determines which entities are consolidated in a parent’s financial statements and therefore affects a group’s reported results, cash flows and financial position – and the activities that are ‘on’ and ‘off’ the group’s balance sheet. Under IFRS, this control assessment is accounted for in accordance with IFRS 10 ‘Consolidated financial statements’.

Some of the challenges of applying the IFRS 10 Special control approach include:

  • identifying the investee’s returns, which in turn involves identifying its assets and liabilities. This may appear straightforward but complications arise when the legal ownership of assets diverges from the accounting depiction (for example, in financial asset transfers that ‘fail’ de-recognition, and in finance leases). In general, the assessment of the investee’s assets and returns should be consistent with the accounting depiction in accordance with IFRS
  • it may not always be clear whether contracts and other arrangements between an investor and an investee
    • create rights or exposure to a variable return from the investee’s performance for the investor; or
    • transfer risk or variability from the investor to the investee IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the relevant activities of an SPE may not be obvious, especially when its activities have been narrowly specified in its purpose and design IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the rights to direct those activities might also be difficult to identify, because for example, they arise only in particular circumstances or from contracts that are outside the legal boundary of the SPE (but closely related to its activities).

IFRS 10 Special control approach sets out requirements for how to apply the control principle in less straight forward circumstances, which are detailed below:  IFRS 10 Special control approach

  • when voting rights or similar rights give an investor power, including situations where the investor holds less than a majority of voting rights and in circumstances involving potential voting rights
  • when an investee is designed so that voting rights are not the dominant factor in deciding who controls the investee, such as when any voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and the relevant activities are directed by means of contractual arrangements IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • involving agency relationships IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • when the investor has control only over specified assets of an investee
  • franchises. IFRS 10 Special control approach

Read more

Best guide IFRS 16 Lessor modifications

Best guide IFRS 16 Lessor modifications

summarises the accounting for lessor modifications that depends on – and may change – the lease classification.

Unlike IAS 17 Leases, the new standard provides detailed guidance on the lessor accounting for lease modifications, with separate guidance for modifications to finance leases and operating leases.

However, additional complexities arise for modifications of a finance lease receivable not accounted for as a separate lease for which, under paragraph 80(b) of IFRS 16, the lessor applies the requirements of IFRS 9 Financial Instruments. A number of issues arise due to differences in the basic concepts between IFRS 16 and IFRS 9.

The following diagram summarises the accounting for lease modifications by a lessor.

Best guide IFRS 16 Lessor modifications

Separate lease Not a separate lease – Finance to operating Not a separate lease – Finance to finance Lessor modifications to operating expenses

* A lessee reassessment of whether it is reasonably certain to exercise an option to extend, or not to exercise a termination option, included in the original lease contract is not a lease modification

Read more

Best focus on IFRS 16 Leases

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases

 

Best focus on IFRS 16 LeasesBest focus on IFRS 16 Leases

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases 2

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases 3

(Source https://www.bdo.global/en-gb/services/audit-assurance/ifrs/ifrs-at-a-glance)

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases or in slightly more detail…..

Read more

Cash-generating unit (CGU)

A cash-generating unit is the smallest identifiable group assets that generates cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets.

Leveraged buyout IFRS 3 best reporting

Leveraged buyout IFRS 3 best reporting – In corporate finance, a leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction where a company is acquired using debt as the main source of consideration. These transactions typically occur when a private equity (PE) firm borrows as much as they can from a variety of lenders (up to 70 or 80 percent of the purchase price) and funds the balance with their own equity. Leveraged buyout IFRS 3 best reporting

1 The process and business reason

The use of leverage (debt) enhances expected returns to the private equity firm. By putting in as little of their own money as possible, PE firms can achieve a large return on equity (ROE) and internal rate of return … Read more

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method – The asset accumulation method and the adjusted net asset method are both generally accepted business valuation methods of the asset-based business valuation approach.

The asset accumulation method is well suited for business and security valuations performed for transaction, taxation, and controversy purposes. All business valuation approaches and methods can indicate the defined value of the subject business entity. IFRS 13 Asset accumulation method

In addition, the asset accumulation method also helps to explain the concluded value—by specifically identifying the value impact of each category of the subject entity assets and liabilities.

IFRS 13 Asset accumulation methodThis informational content of the asset accumulation method is particularly useful in a transaction, taxation, or controversy context when the particular analysis … Read more

Implementation IFRS 16 Leases Air France KLM

Implementation IFRS 16 Leases Air France KLMImplementation IFRS 16 Leases Air France KLM – In the Registration Document 2018 including the annual financial report by AIR FRANCE KLM GROUP the Group implemented IFRS 16 and IFRS 15 and IFRS 9. Here are some excerpts from the document to illustrate the effects:

[Air France KLM – 2018 Registration document – page 220]

note 2. Restatement of 2017 Financial statements

Since January 1, 2018, the Air France – KLM Group has applied the following three new standards:

IFRS 9 “Financial Instruments”

  • IFRS 15 “Revenue Recognition from Contracts with Customers”

This standard came into force on January 1, 2018.

In accordance with IAS 8 “Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Read more

Leases capitalisation on the balance sheet

Summary Leases capitalisation on the balance sheet

IFRS 16 includes a single accounting model for all leases by lessees.

The main implications of the new standard on current practice for lessees include:

  • Operating leases are similar (but differently) to finance leases recorded in the financial position under IFRS 16 (subject to the exceptions described below)
  • All leases (subject to the exceptions described below) will be capitalised on the balance sheet by recognising a ‘right-of-use’ asset and a lease liability for the present value of the obligation
  • No rental expense! i.e. no more straight-line expenses for operating lease costs. All leases will incur a front-end loaded expense, comprising depreciation on the right-of-use asset, and interest on the lease liability
  • When initially
Read more

Leasehold makegood and restoration provisions

Leasehold makegood and restoration provisions – Lease makegood / leasehold restoration provisions should be recognised in relation to properties held under operating leases. Such a provision may arise because many property leases contain clauses under which the lessee has to make good dilapidations or other damage which occurs to the property during the course of the lease or restore a property to a specified condition.

Overview Leasehold makegood and restoration provisions leased office

Under IAS 37 14, a provision shall be recognised when: Leasehold makegood and restoration provisions leased office

  • “An entity has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event;
  • It is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be
Read more

Sale and leaseback accounting

Sale and leaseback accounting – IFRS 16 makes significant changes to sale and leaseback accounting. A sale and leaseback transaction is one where an entity (the seller-lessee) transfers an asset to another entity (the buyer-lessor) for consideration and leases that asset back from the buyer-lessor.

A sale and leaseback transaction is a popular way for entities to secure long-term financing from substantial property, plant and equipment assets such as land and buildings. IAS 17 covered the accounting for a sale and leaseback transaction in considerable detail but only from the perspective of the seller-lessee. As IFRS 16 has withdrawn the concepts of operating leases and finance leases from lessee accounting, the accounting requirements that the seller-lessee must apply to a … Read more