IFRS 15 Real estate Revenue complete and accurate recognition

IFRS 15 Real estate

Under IFRS 15 real estate entities recognize revenue over the construction period if certain conditions are met.

Key points

  • An entity must judge whether the different elements of a contract can be separated from each other based on the distinct criteria. A more complex judgment exists for real estate developers that provide services or deliver common properties or amenities in addition to the property being sold.
  • Contract modifications are common in the real estate development industry. Contract modifications might needIFRS 15 Real estate to be accounted for as a new contract, or combined and accounted for together with an existing contract.
  • Real estate managers may structure their arrangements such that services and fees are in different contracts. These contracts may meet the requirements to be accounted for as a combined contract when applying IFRS 15.
  • Real estate management entities are often entitled to several different fees. IFRS 15 will require a manager to consider whether the services should be viewed as a single performance obligation, or whether some of these services are ‘distinct’ and should therefore be treated as separate performance obligations.
  • Variable consideration for entities in the real estate industry may come in the form of claims, awards and incentive payments, discounts, rebates, refunds, credits, price concessions, performance bonuses, penalties or other similar items.
  • Real estate developers will need to consider whether they meet any of the three criteria necessary for recognition of revenue over time.

IFRS 15 core principle

The core principle of IFRS 15 is that revenue reflects the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

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IFRS 15 Measuring progress to completion – Best complete explanation

IFRS 15 Measuring progress to completion

– how to do it, what to use, learn it all

Introduction

For each performance obligation satisfied over time, revenue must be recognised over time (IFRS 15.39-45 & IFRS 15.B14-B19). To do so, an entity shall measure the progress towards complete satisfaction of the performance obligation.

The measurement of progress has the objective of faithfully depicting an entity’s performance in transferring control of the goods or services promised to the customer (that is, the extent to which the performance obligation is satisfied).

An entity shall apply a single method of measuring progress for each performance obligation satisfied over time, and shall apply that method consistently to similar performance obligations and in similar circumstances.

At the end of each reporting period, an entity shall remeasure its progress towards complete satisfaction of each performance obligation satisfied over time.

In July 2015 the Joint Transition Resource Group (TRG a combined effort by IASB and FASB to detect problems raised by the implementation of the revenue recognition standards) clarified that the principle of applying a single method of measuring progress for a given performance obligation is also applicable to a combined performance obligation, i.e. one that contains multiple non-distinct goods or services.

Hence, it is not appropriate to apply several methods depending on the stage of performance, even if these methods all belong to one of the two major categories of methods presented below (output methods vs input methods), for example a method measuring progress on the basis of hours expended, and a method measuring progress on the basis of labour costs incurred.

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Construction contract – How 2 best account for it in IFRS 15

A construction contract is a contract specifically negotiated for the construction of (a combination of) assets that are closely interrelated in terms of design

Transfer of control for distinct licences

Transfer of control for distinct licencesTransfer of control for distinct licences – IFRS 15 indicates that an entity must determine, at contract inception, whether it will transfer control of a promised good or service over time. If an entity does not satisfy a performance obligation over time, the performance obligation is satisfied at a point in time. A performance obligation is satisfied over time if it meets one of the following criteria: Transfer of control for distinct licences

  • The customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefits provided by the entity’s performance as the entity performs – by providing hosting services, for example. Transfer of control for distinct licences
  • The entity’s performance creates or enhances an asset that the customer controls as the asset is created
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Transition to new IFRS 15 Disclosures

Transition to new IFRS 15 Disclosures

Disclosing the chance

 

Transition to new IFRS 15 Disclosures

Transition to new IFRS 15 Disclosures – Disclosures for IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers in respect of transition options:

Requirements: Transition to new IFRS 15 Disclosures

IFRS paragraph Narrative
IAS 1:117(b) Disclose accounting policies that are relevant to understanding the financial statements (i.e. those for material items).
IFRS 15:119 Disclose information about performance obligations in contracts with customers, including a description of all of the following:
  1. When the entity typically satisfies its performance obligations (for example, upon shipment, upon delivery, as services are rendered or upon completion of service), including when performance obligations are satisfied in a bill-and-hold arrangement;
  2. The significant payment terms (for example, when payment
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Satisfaction of performance obligations

Satisfaction of performance obligations – An entity recognises revenue only when it satisfies a performance obligation by transferring control of a promised good or service to the customer. Control of an asset refers to the ability of the customer to direct the use of and obtain substantially all of the cash inflows, or the reduction of cash outflows, generated by the goods or services. Control also means the ability to prevent other entities from directing the use of, and receiving the benefit from, a good or service. Satisfaction of performance obligations

The standard indicates that an entity must determine at contract inception whether it will transfer control of a promised good or service over time. If an entity does … Read more