The best 1 in overview – IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

forward-looking information to recognise expected credit losses for all debt-type financial assets

 

Under IFRS 9 Impairment requirements, recognition of impairment no longer depends on a reporting entity first identifying a credit loss event.

IFRS 9 instead uses more forward-looking information to recognise expected credit losses for all debt-type financial assets that are not measured at fair value through profit or loss.

IFRS 9 requires an entity to recognise a loss allowance for expected credit losses on:

  • debt instruments measured at amortised cost
  • debt instruments measured at fair value through other comprehensive income
  • lease receivables
  • contract assets (as defined in IFRS 15 ‘Revenue from Contracts with Customers’)
  • loan commitments that are not measured at fair value through profit or loss
  • financial guarantee contracts (except those accounted for as insurance contracts).

IFRS 9 requires an expected loss allowance to be estimated for each of these types of asset or exposure. However, the Standard specifies three different approaches depending on the type of asset or exposure:

IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

* optional application to trade receivables and contract assets with a significant financing component, and to lease receivables

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IFRS vs US GAAP Employee benefits

IFRS vs US GAAP Employee benefits

The following discussion captures a number of the more significant GAAP differences under both the impairment standards. It is important to note that the discussion is not inclusive of all GAAP differences in this area.

The significant differences and similarities between U.S. GAAP and IFRS related to accounting for investment property are summarized in the following tables.

Standards Reference

US GAAP1

IFRS2

715 Compensation – Retirement benefits

710-10 Compensation- General – Overall

712-10 Compensation – Nonretirement Postemployment Benefits – Overall

IAS 19 Employee Benefits

IFRIC 14 The limit on a defined benefit asset minimum funding requirements and their interaction

Introduction

The guidance under US GAAP and IFRS as it relates to employee benefits contains some significant differences with potentially far-reaching implications.

This narrative deals with employee benefits provided under formal plans and agreements between an entity and its employees, under legislation or through industry arrangements, including those provided under informal practices that give rise to constructive obligations.

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IAS 1 Common control transactions v Newco formation

Common control transactions v Newco formation

are two different events, that sometimes interactCommon control transactions v Newco formation

  • Common control transactions represent the transfer of assets or an exchange of equity interests among entities under the same parent’s control. “Control” can be established through a majority voting interest, as well as variable interests and contractual arrangements. Entities that are consolidated by the same parent—or that would be consolidated, if consolidated financial statements were required to be prepared by the parent or controlling party—are considered to be under common control.Determining whether common control exists requires judgment and could have broad implications for financial reporting, deals and tax. Just a few examples are:
    • A reporting entity charters a newly formed entity to effect a transaction.
    • A ‘Never-Neverland‘-domiciled company transfers assets to a subsidiary domiciled in a different jurisdiction.
    • Two companies under common control combine to form one legal entity.
    • Prior to spin-off of a subsidiary by a parent entity, another wholly owned subsidiary transfers net assets to the “SpinCo.”
    • As part of a reorganization, a parent entity merges with and into a wholly owned subsidiary.
  • Newco formations may be used in Business Combinations or businesses controlled by the same party (or parties). Just a few examples are: Common control transactions v Newco formation
    • A Newco can be formed by the controlling party (for example, to facilitate subsequent disposal of the newly created group through an initial public offering (IPO) or a spin-off or by a third-party acquirer (for example to raise funds to effect the acquisition); Common control transactions v Newco formation
    • A Newco can pay cash or shares to effect an acquisition; and
    • A Newco can be formed to acquire just one business or more than one business.

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Consolidated financial statements

The financial statements of a group in which the assets, liabilities, equity, income, expenses and cash flows of the parent and its subsidiaries are presented as those of a single economic entity. The detailed ‘mechanics’ of the consolidation process vary from one group to another, depending on the group’s structure, history and financial reporting systems. IFRS 10 and much of the literature on consolidation are based on a traditional approach to consolidation under which the financial statements (or, more commonly in practice, group ‘reporting packs’) of group entities are aggregated and then adjusted on each reporting date.

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI – IFRS 12 requires disclosures for each of an entity’s subsidiaries that have material non-controlling interests. Such disclosures assist users when estimating future profit or loss and cash flows (for example, by identifying the assets and liabilities that are held by subsidiaries, risk exposures of particular group entities, and those subsidiaries that have significant cash flows). The disclosures are as follows (new disclosures compared to the previous standard are in bold):

  • The subsidiary’s nameDisclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • Its principal place of business (and country of incorporation, if different)Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • The proportion of ownership interests held by non-controlling interestsDisclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • The proportion of voting rights held by noncontrolling interests
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Earnings per share

Earnings per share – The objective of IAS 33 Earnings per share is prescribing principles for the determination and presentation of earnings per share, so as to improve performance comparisons between different entities in the same reporting period and between different reporting periods for the same entity.

Earnings per share is mostly used in the consolidated financial statements of a group with a parent:

  1. whose ordinary shares or potential ordinary shares are traded in a public market (a domestic or foreign stock exchange or an over-the-counter market, including local and regional markets); or
  2. that files, or is in the process of filing, its financial statements with a securities commission or other regulatory organization for the purpose of issuing ordinary shares
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Individual or collective assessment for impairment – Which 1 is best varies per case

Individual or collective assessment for impairment - An entity should normally identify significant increases in credit risk and recognise lifetime ECLs

Group cash pooling and company accounts

Group cash pooling and company accounts – Cash pooling arrangements arise where one group entity (which may be the ultimate group parent, or a fellow subsidiary) acts as the treasury function for the rest of the group. Under these arrangements, one entity within a group holds and maintains all cash balances with an external financial institution(s) and advances funds to group entities. Group cash pooling and company accounts

Often, a group treasury function is used in order to make the most efficient use of cash resources within a group, and to enable hedge accounting transactions to be entered into at group-level at the lowest overall cost. Typically, the group entities that act as a treasury function are not financial institutions. … Read more

Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest

Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interestAllocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest is about consolidation, obtain control over but not hold 100% in another entity/subsidiary.

When a parent entity first obtains control over another entity, it recognises any non-controlling interest in the new subsidiary’s net assets as illustrated in the example below. In subsequent periods the parent allocates to the non-controlling interest its proportion of:

  • profit or loss Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest
  • each component of other comprehensive income [IFRS 10 B94].

i.e. the entity’s profit or loss in consolidated profit or loss of the parent and the entity’s other comprehensive income in consolidated other comprehensive income of the parent. Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest

The proportion allocated to non-controlling interest is based … Read more

The relevant activities of an investee

The relevant activities of an investee – Don’t get fooled, relevant activities for financial reporting and consolidation purposes does not mean that the activities of an investee are the same as the activities of other entities (parent entity and subsidiary entities) consolidated into that one group. No…….. it is about whether the activities significantly affect the investee’s returns. In other words can the parent entity earn from the relevant activities.

Let that be clear!!

IFRS 10 introduces the concept of ‘relevant activities’. This is a critical part of the model. This concept clarifies which aspects of an investee’s activities must be under the direction of an investor for that investor to have control for consolidation purposes.The relevant activities of an investee

Examples of activities that, … Read more