Royalty Avoidance Approach

One method to determine the market value of Intellectual Property assets like patents, trademarks, and copyrights is to use the royalty avoidance approach (also known as Relief from royalty or Royalty Relief). This approach determines the value of Intellectual Property assets by estimating what it would cost the business if it had to purchase the Intellectual Property (IP) it uses from an outsider.

This approach requires the valuator to (1) project future sales of the products that use the technology, (2) determine an appropriate reasonable royalty rate, and (3) determine either a present value factor or an appropriate discount rate. The result is the present value of the Intellectual Property to the company. See the following example of Read more

History of intangible assets

In November 1983, the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC) approved the International Accounting Standards IAS 22 ‘Accounting for Business Combinations’ that contained the principles for accounting for goodwill. IAS 22, being concerned with business combinations, does not define goodwill. It also does not address the issues of revaluation of goodwill as well as accounting for internally generated goodwill. For the purpose of improved international accounting standards (IASs), the IASC issued exposure draft (ED 32) “The Comparability of Financial Statements” in January 1989. ED 32 proposed amendments to IAS 22 as well as other IASs. The draft defined goodwill as the difference between the cost of acquisition and the fair values of net identifiable assets acquired. The draft … Read more

Technology-based intangible assets – Other technology

In a Business Combinations, this is a intangible asset and is therefore recognised separately from goodwill, provided that its fair value can be measured reliably. This customer-related intangible asset does not arise from contractual or other legal rights, but meets the definition of an intangible asset because it is separable.

  1. Unpatented technology or know-how Technology-based intangible assets – Other technology

    Know-how and trade secrets are intangible assets owned by almost every organization. While they may be documented in files, drawings, concepts, and archives, such material is usually only a small part of the whole asset. Often described as something “in the head of the workforce,” know-how is an integral component of the people working in an organization.

    One

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Technology-based intangible assets – Legal titles and secrets

In a Business Combinations, these –by definition– are intangible assets and are therefore recognised separately from goodwill, provided that their fair values can be measured reliably. These intangible assets meet the definition of an intangible asset because they again –by definition– arise from contractual or other legal rights.Technology-based intangible assets – Legal titles and secrets

  • Patented technology
    A patent is an exclusive right granted for an invention. While it is certainly true that not all enterprises develop patentable inventions, it is a wrong to believe that patents only apply to complex physical or chemical processes and products or that they are only useful to large corporations. Patents can be obtained for any area of technology from paper clips to computers. Moreover, when people think of patents,
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