IFRS 10 Special control approach

IFRS 10 Special control approach

– determines which entities are consolidated in a parent’s financial statements and therefore affects a group’s reported results, cash flows and financial position – and the activities that are ‘on’ and ‘off’ the group’s balance sheet. Under IFRS, this control assessment is accounted for in accordance with IFRS 10 ‘Consolidated financial statements’.

Some of the challenges of applying the IFRS 10 Special control approach include:

  • identifying the investee’s returns, which in turn involves identifying its assets and liabilities. This may appear straightforward but complications arise when the legal ownership of assets diverges from the accounting depiction (for example, in financial asset transfers that ‘fail’ de-recognition, and in finance leases). In general, the assessment of the investee’s assets and returns should be consistent with the accounting depiction in accordance with IFRS
  • it may not always be clear whether contracts and other arrangements between an investor and an investee
    • create rights or exposure to a variable return from the investee’s performance for the investor; or
    • transfer risk or variability from the investor to the investee IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the relevant activities of an SPE may not be obvious, especially when its activities have been narrowly specified in its purpose and design IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the rights to direct those activities might also be difficult to identify, because for example, they arise only in particular circumstances or from contracts that are outside the legal boundary of the SPE (but closely related to its activities).

IFRS 10 Special control approach sets out requirements for how to apply the control principle in less straight forward circumstances, which are detailed below:  IFRS 10 Special control approach

  • when voting rights or similar rights give an investor power, including situations where the investor holds less than a majority of voting rights and in circumstances involving potential voting rights
  • when an investee is designed so that voting rights are not the dominant factor in deciding who controls the investee, such as when any voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and the relevant activities are directed by means of contractual arrangements IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • involving agency relationships IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • when the investor has control only over specified assets of an investee
  • franchises. IFRS 10 Special control approach

Read more

Overview IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements

Overview IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial StatementsShort – To establish principles for the presentation and preparation of consolidated financial statements when an entity controls one or more other entities Overview IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements

Longer – IFRS 10 replaces the part of IAS 27 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements that addresses accounting for subsidiaries on consolidation. What remains in IAS 27 after the implementation of IFRS 10 is the accounting treatment for subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates in their separate financial statements.Contingent consideration Contingent consideration Contingent consideration Contingent consideration Contingent consideration

The aim of IFRS 10 is to establish a single control model that is applied to all entities including special purpose entities. The changes require those dealing with the implementation of IFRS 10 to exercise Read more

Consolidated financial statements

The financial statements of a group in which the assets, liabilities, equity, income, expenses and cash flows of the parent and its subsidiaries are presented as those of a single economic entity. The detailed ‘mechanics’ of the consolidation process vary from one group to another, depending on the group’s structure, history and financial reporting systems. IFRS 10 and much of the literature on consolidation are based on a traditional approach to consolidation under which the financial statements (or, more commonly in practice, group ‘reporting packs’) of group entities are aggregated and then adjusted on each reporting date.

US GAAP vs IFRS Consolidations at-a-glance

US GAAP vs IFRS Consolidations at-a-glance – IFRS provides indicators of control, some of which individually determine the need to consolidate. However, where control is not apparent, consolidation is based on an overall assessment of all of the relevant facts, including the allocation of risks and benefits between the parties. The indicators provided under IFRS help the reporting entity in making that assessment. Consolidation in financial statements is required under IFRS when an entity is exposed to variable returns from another entity and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the other entity. US GAAP vs IFRS Consolidations at-a-glance

US GAAP has a two-tier consolidation model: one focused on voting rights (the voting interest model) and … Read more

Investments in Associates 1st and best read

Investments in Associates 1st and best read – Just as a starter, two definitions!

Associate: An entity, including an unincorporated entity such as a partnership, over which an investor has significant influence and which is neither a subsidiary nor an interest in a joint venture. Investments in Associates 1st and best read

Significant influence: The power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of the investee but it is not control or joint control over those policies. Investments in Associates 1st and best read

What are investments in associates?

A holding of 20% or more of the voting power (directly or through subsidiaries) will indicate significant influence unless it can be clearly demonstrated otherwise. If the … Read more

Consolidation Assess control over an investment

Consolidation Assess control over an investmentIFRS 10 Consolidation Assess control over an investment is the key to consolidate a investee entity or not. Whether a subsidiary or a consolidated structured entity.

Voting rights in subsidiaries

In many cases, when decision-making is controlled by voting rights, and those voting rights entitle an entity to returns (e.g., voting shares), it is clear that whoever holds a majority of those voting rights controls the investee. However, in other cases (such as for structured entities, or when there are potential voting rights, or less than a majority of voting rights), it may not be so clear. Consolidation Assess control over an investment

Contractual relations for consolidated structured entities

In those instances, further analysis is needed and the factors … Read more

Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest

Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interestAllocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest is about consolidation, obtain control over but not hold 100% in another entity/subsidiary.

When a parent entity first obtains control over another entity, it recognises any non-controlling interest in the new subsidiary’s net assets as illustrated in the example below. In subsequent periods the parent allocates to the non-controlling interest its proportion of:

  • profit or loss Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest
  • each component of other comprehensive income [IFRS 10 B94].

i.e. the entity’s profit or loss in consolidated profit or loss of the parent and the entity’s other comprehensive income in consolidated other comprehensive income of the parent. Allocation between Controlling and Non-controlling interest

The proportion allocated to non-controlling interest is based … Read more

Control without a majority of voting rights

Control without a majority of voting rightsControl without a majority of voting rights is a more special case of structuring the investments of investors in companies. IFRS 10 confirms that an investor with the majority of an investee’s voting rights controls an investee in most circumstances. In the absence of other relevant factors the majority vote holder has control if: Control without a majority of voting rights

Read more

Potential voting rights

Potential voting rightsPotential voting rights – An investor may hold instruments that (if exercised or converted), give the investor power to direct the relevant activities. These are called ‘potential voting rights’ and may be held through ownership of the following types of instrument:

  • share options and warrants Potential voting rights
  • convertible bonds Potential voting rights
  • convertible preference shares. Potential voting rights

Potential voting rights can contribute to control of an investee in combination with current voting rights, or even confer control on their own. However, IFRS 10 requires an assessment to determine whether potential voting rights are substantive. IFRS 10 has no bright lines and so judgment will be required.

IFRS 10’s ‘substantive’ assessment takes into account both:

  • the general guidance
Read more

De facto agent

A party is a de facto agent when the investor has, or those that direct the activities have, the ability to direct that party to act on the investor’s behalf.