IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers Quick best overview

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

the easy way to obtain an solid overview

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers

(Source https://www.bdo.global/en-gb/services/audit-assurance/ifrs/ifrs-at-a-glance)

What is the

Read more

Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15 Complete and Exemplary Read

Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Barter transactions are the exchange of goods or services, in exchange for other goods or services

IFRS References: IFRS 15, IAS 16, IAS 38, IAS 40 Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

If an entity enters into a non-monetary exchange with a customer as part of its ordinary activities, then generally it applies the guidance on non-cash consideration in the IFRS 15 Revenue standard. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Non-monetary exchanges with non-customers do not give rise to revenue. If a non-monetary exchange of assets with a non-customer has commercial substance, then the transaction gives rise to a gain or loss. The cost of the asset acquired is generally the fair value of the asset surrendered, adjusted for any cash transferred. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Simple bartering involves no cost as this involves exchanging goods and/or services of the same value.

A barter exchange operates as a broker and bank in which each participating member has an account that is debited when purchases Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15 are made, and credited when sales are made. Compared to one-to-one bartering, concerns over unequal exchanges are reduced in a barter exchange.

The exchange plays an important role because it provides the record-keeping, brokering expertise and monthly statements to each member. Commercial exchanges make money by charging a commission on each transaction on either the buy or sell side, or a combination of both. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

In general, one requirement remains in tact in non-monetary transactions, revenue cannot be recognised if the amount of revenue is not reliably measurable. Non-monetary transactions IFRS 15

Read more

The best way for IFRS 15 Measuring progress to completion

IFRS 15 Measuring progress to completion

– how to do it, what to use, learn it all

Introduction

For each performance obligation satisfied over time, revenue must be recognised over time (IFRS 15.39-45 & IFRS 15.B14-B19). To do so, an entity shall measure the progress towards complete satisfaction of the performance obligation.

The measurement of progress has the objective of faithfully depicting an entity’s performance in transferring control of the goods or services promised to the customer (that is, the extent to which the performance obligation is satisfied).

An entity shall apply a single method of measuring progress for each performance obligation satisfied over time, and shall apply that method consistently to similar performance obligations and in similar circumstances.

At the end of each reporting period, an entity shall remeasure its progress towards complete satisfaction of each performance obligation satisfied over time.

In July 2015 the Joint Transition Resource Group (TRG a combined effort by IASB and FASB to detect problems raised by the implementation of the revenue recognition standards) clarified that the principle of applying a single method of measuring progress for a given performance obligation is also applicable to a combined performance obligation, i.e. one that contains multiple non-distinct goods or services.

Hence, it is not appropriate to apply several methods depending on the stage of performance, even if these methods all belong to one of the two major categories of methods presented below (output methods vs input methods), for example a method measuring progress on the basis of hours expended, and a method measuring progress on the basis of labour costs incurred.

Read more

Contract Modifications under IFRS 15

Contract Modifications under IFRS 15 – Just two practical examples, to better understand all kind of things for IFRS 15.

On 1 January 20X1, Wireless Company enters into a two-year contract with a customer for a 2-gigabyte (GB) data plan with unlimited talk and text for CU60/month and a subsidised handset for which the customer pays CU200. Contract Modifications under IFRS 15

The handset has a stand-alone selling price of CU600. Contract Modifications under IFRS 15

For purposes of this illustration, the time value of money has not been considered, the stand-alone selling price of the wireless plan is assumed to be the same as the contractual price and the effect of the constraint on variable consideration is not considered. … Read more

Stand-alone selling price

The best evidence of standalone selling price is the price that the entity charges for the good or service in a separate transaction with a customer. However, in many cases goods or services are sold exclusively as a package with other goods or services rather than on an individual basis (e.g. nonrenewable customer support).

Determining when promises are performance obligations

In determining when promises are performance obligations the assessment has to be made whether

  1. the performance obligations consist of a series of distinct goods and/or services that are substantially the same and have the same pattern of transfer, OR Determining when promises are performance obligations
  2. a series of non-distinct goods and/or services that are not substantially the same and not have the same pattern of transfer.

This is important in the recognition of revenue over time or at a point in time. Determining when promises are performance obligations

Separate performance obligations

After identifying the promised goods or services within a contract, an entity determines which of those goods or services will be treated as separate performance obligations. That is, … Read more

The five contract identification criteria

IFRS 15 9 Revenue from Contracts with Customers is applied to contracts with customers that meet all of the five contract identification criteria

Distinct goods or services

Distinct goods or services is a cornerstone of IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers. Distinct means the customer can benefit directly from the service

Option for discounted software

Option for discounted software in general the entity shall allocate a discount proportionately to all performance obligations in the contract with the customer.

Performance obligation

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer to the customer either 1 distinct goods/services or 2 a series of distinct goods/services