IFRS 18 Presentation and Disclosure in Financial Statements – Best read

IFRS 18 Presentation and Disclosure in Financial Statements

The IASB’s newly issued standard IFRS 18 mainly deals with the presentation of the income statement, balance sheet and certain footnotes. At the same time, certain aspects of the cash flow statement are modified. IFRS 18 does not change the recognition and measurement of the components of financial statements; therefore, the amounts reported as shareholders’ equity and net income are both unchanged. However, it will have a significant impact on the presentation and disaggregation of what is reported (primarily in the income statement and footnotes), including what subtotals companies must provide and how these are defined.

There are five main areas where we think the new standard will help investors as users of IFRS Financial Statements:IFRS 18 Presentation and Disclosure in Financial Statements

Operating–Investing–Financing classification

IFRS 18 aims to establishes a structured statement of profit or loss by implementing the following measures:

  • It introduces three defined categories for income and expenses: operating, investing, and financing.
    • Operating – income/expenses resulting from the company’s main business operations.
    • Investingincome/expenses from:
      • investments in associates, joint ventures and unconsolidated subsidiaries;
      • cash and cash equivalents;
      • assets that generate a return individually and largely independently (e.g. rental income from investment properties).
    • Financing – consisting of:
      • income/expenses from liabilities related to raising finance only (e.g. interest expense on borrowings); and
      • interest income/expenses and effects of changes in interest rates from other liabilities (e.g. interest expense on lease liabilities).
  • It mandates to present new defined totals and subtotals, including operating profit, thereby enhancing the clarity and consistency of financial reporting.

Entities primarily engaged in investing in assets or providing finance to customers are subject to specific categorisation requirements. This entails that additional income and expense items, which would typically be classified as investing or financing activities, are instead categorised under operating activities. Consequently, operating profit reflects the outcomes of an entity’s core business operations. Identifying the main business activity involves exercising judgment based on factual circumstances.

Read more

IFRS 16 Lessor accounting

IFRS 16 Lessor accounting

Lessors continue to classify leases as finance or operating leases.

1. Lessor accounting model

The lessor follows a dual accounting approach for lease accounting. The accounting is based on whether significant risks and rewards incidental to ownership of an underlying asset are transferred to the lessee, in which case the lease is classified as a finance lease. This is similar to the previous lease accounting requirements that applied to lessors. The lessor accounting models are also essentially unchanged from IAS 17 Leases. [IFRS 16.B53, IFRS 16.BC289]

Are the lessee and lessor accounting models consistent?

No. A key consequence of the decision to retain the IAS 17 dual accounting model for lessors is a lack of consistency with the new lessee accounting model. This can be seen in the case Lease classification below:

There are also more detailed differences. For example, lessees and lessors use the same guidance for determining the lease term and assessing whether renewal and purchase options are reasonably certain to be exercised, and termination options not reasonably certain to be exercised. However, unlike lessees, lessors do not reassess their initial assessments of lease term and whether renewal and purchase options are reasonably certain to be exercised, and termination options not reasonably certain to be exercised (see changes in the lease term in the link).

Other differences are more subtle. For example, although the definition of lease payments is similar for lessors and lessees (see lease payments in the link), the difference is the amount of residual value guarantee included in the lease payments.

  • The lessor includes the full amount (regardless of the likelihood that payment will be due) of any residual value guarantees provided to the lessor by the lessee, a party related to the lessee or a third party unrelated to the lessor that is financially capable of discharging the obligations under the guarantee.
  • The lessee includes only any amounts expected to be payable to the lessor under a residual value guarantee.

Read more

IFRS 7 Market risk disclosures

Market risk - The risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices.

Disclosure recognised insurance amounts

Disclosure recognised insurance amountsDisclosure recognised insurance amounts

or the clarification and explanation of recognised insurance amounts for a complex industry – insurance. An entity is required to disclose the following:

  • Reconciliations that show how the net carrying amount of contracts within the scope of IFRS 17 changed during each period (see 1 below)
  • Disclosures for contracts other than those to which the entity applies the premium allocation approach:
    • Analysis of insurance revenue recognized in the period for contracts (see 2 below) Disclosure recognised insurance amounts
    • Analysis of the effect of contracts initially recognized in each period (see 3 below) Disclosure recognised insurance amounts
    • Explanation of when the entity expects to recognize the contractual service margin (CSM) at
Read more

Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17

Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17 – Explanation of recognized amounts from IFRS 4 to IFRS 17

1 Introduction Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17

[IFRS 17 (98), IFRS 17 (93)-(96)]

Disclosure requirements IFRS 4 and IFRS 17IFRS 4 requires an entity to disclose information that identifies and explains the amounts in its financial statements arising from insurance contracts. In order to comply with this objective, IFRS 4 outlines what should be disclosed regarding reconciliations, policies, methods and processes but provides limited guidance on how these disclosure requirements should be met.

IFRS 17 requirements are much more extensive. It requires the entity to provide specific reconciliations showing how the net carrying amounts of insurance contracts changed during the period as a Read more