IFRS 15 Quick overview Revenue from contracts with customers

IFRS 15 Quick overview Revenue from contracts with customers – the easy way to obtain an solid overview.

What is the objective of IFRS 15?

To establish principles that an entity shall apply to report useful information to users of financial statements about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from a contract with a customer.

How does IFRS 15 meet this objective?

The core principle of IFRS 15 is that an entity should recognise revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to the customer in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

Practical expedient – the portfolio

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Contract Modifications under IFRS 15

Contract Modifications under IFRS 15 – Just two practical examples, to better understand all kind of things for IFRS 15.

On 1 January 20X1, Wireless Company enters into a two-year contract with a customer for a 2-gigabyte (GB) data plan with unlimited talk and text for CU60/month and a subsidised handset for which the customer pays CU200. Contract Modifications under IFRS 15

The handset has a stand-alone selling price of CU600. Contract Modifications under IFRS 15

For purposes of this illustration, the time value of money has not been considered, the stand-alone selling price of the wireless plan is assumed to be the same as the contractual price and the effect of the constraint on variable consideration is not considered. … Read more

Variable consideration of the transaction price

Variable consideration of the transaction price – IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (contents page is here) introduced a single and comprehensive framework which sets out how much revenue is to be recognised, and when. The core principle is that a vendor should recognise revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the vendor expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. See a summary of IFRS 15 here. Variable consideration of the transaction price

This section is part of step 3 determining the transaction price. Instead of the amount of consideration specified in a contract being fixed, the Read more

Dealer sales vehicle incentives

Dealer sales vehicle incentives – To apply IFRS 15, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) will need to change the way they evaluate incentives. Original equipment manufacturers need to use significant judgement when they identify separate performance obligations (i.e., units of account), which may be different from those identified under IAS 18.

Original equipment manufacturers frequently offer sales incentives in contracts to sell vehicles to dealers. These sales incentives may be cash rebate bonuses or another type of incentive available to dealers and retail customers (who purchase the vehicle from the dealer). They may also include free, or heavily discounted, goods or services provided to retail customers, such as free satellite radio or free maintenance for a specified period. Dealer sales Read more

Contract modifications and variable consideration

Contract modifications and variable consideration are discussed on this page.

IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (contents page is here) introduced a single and comprehensive framework which sets out how much revenue is to be recognised, and when. The core principle is that a vendor should recognise revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the vendor expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. See a summary of IFRS 15 here. Contract modifications and variable consideration

Contract modification

A contract modification arises when the parties approve a change in the scope and/or the price of a contract (eg a … Read more

Purchase price of PPE

Purchase price of PPE – Here is one complete case of the purchase price and other cost that may be capitalised when acquiring a non-current asset in the day-to-day business.

THE CASE Purchase price of property

Entity K purchased a plant for a gross price of CU 200 million. The seller granted a 0.5% rebate. The gross price includes excise duty CU 18 million for which the buyer entity will get a tax refund and non-refundable VAT of CU 10 million. The company has also incurred CU 15 million for transportation costs, handling charges and insurance, CU 5 million for installation and CU 3 million for testing and technical engineering fees. It has earned CU 0.2 million from selling goods Read more

Present obligation as a result of past event

Present obligation as a result of past event – some basics in accrual accounting, some legal presumptions and a lot to understand….

Obligation: A duty or responsibility to act or perform in a certain way. Obligations may be legally enforceable as a consequence of a binding contract or statutory requirement. Obligations also arise, however, from normal business practice, custom and a desire to maintain good business relations or act in an equitable manner.

It is important to distinguish between a present obligation and a future commitment. A management decision to purchase assets in the future does not, in itself, give rise to a present obligation.

Settlement of a present obligation will involve the entity giving up resources embodying economic … Read more