Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution – The best read

Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution

Category description – Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution includes emissions that occur in the reporting year from transportation and distribution of sold products in vehicles and facilities not owned or controlled by the reporting company.

Overview – Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution

Reporting on Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution involves a comprehensive analysis of the logistical processes and operations involved in transporting goods from production facilities to end consumers. Here’s an executive overview:

  1. Scope and Definition: Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution encompasses the movement of goods from manufacturing plants or warehouses to various distribution centers, retailers, or directly to customers. It involves multiple modes of transportation such as road, rail, sea, and air, as well as associated warehousing and distribution activities.
  2. Key Components:
    • Transportation Modes: Assess the utilization of different transportation modes and their efficiency in terms of cost, speed, and reliability.
    • Distribution Network: Evaluate the design and optimization of distribution networks to ensure timely delivery and minimize costs.
    • Warehousing: Analyze the efficiency of warehousing operations in terms of inventory management, storage capacity, and order fulfillment.
    • Last-Mile Delivery: Focus on the final stage of delivery to customers, addressing challenges and strategies for improving efficiency and customer satisfaction.
  3. Performance Metrics:
    • On-Time Delivery: Measure the percentage of deliveries made according to schedule to assess reliability.
    • Transit Time: Evaluate the average time taken for goods to move through the transportation and distribution network.
    • Cost per Unit: Analyze the cost incurred per unit of goods transported, considering transportation, warehousing, and handling expenses.Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution
    • Inventory Turnover: Assess the rate at which inventory is sold and replaced, indicating efficiency in managing stock levels.
  4. Challenges and Opportunities:
    • Infrastructure: Address challenges related to transportation infrastructure, such as road congestion, port capacity, and airport efficiency.
    • Sustainability: Explore opportunities for reducing the environmental impact of transportation and distribution operations through alternative fuels, route optimization, and packaging innovations.
    • Technology Integration: Highlight the role of technology in optimizing logistics processes, including the use of IoT devices, predictive analytics, and automation to improve efficiency and visibility across the supply chain.
  5. Regulatory and Compliance:
    • Compliance with Regulations: Ensure adherence to regulations governing transportation safety, labor practices, environmental standards, and customs procedures.
    • Trade Policies: Monitor changes in trade policies and tariffs that may impact transportation costs, lead times, and supply chain resilience.
  6. Strategic Recommendations:
    • Network Optimization: Identify opportunities to streamline the transportation and distribution network to reduce costs and improve service levels.
    • Technology Investment: Recommend investments in transportation management systems (TMS), warehouse management systems (WMS), and tracking technologies to enhance visibility and control.
    • Collaboration: Encourage collaboration with transportation partners and suppliers to leverage economies of scale, share resources, and mitigate risks.
  7. Future Outlook:
    • Market Trends: Anticipate emerging trends such as e-commerce growth, omnichannel distribution, and the adoption of electric and autonomous vehicles.
    • Resilience Planning: Prepare for disruptions such as natural disasters, geopolitical tensions, and pandemics by enhancing supply chain resilience and flexibility.

In summary, reporting on Category 9 Downstream Transportation and Distribution involves assessing the efficiency, reliability, and sustainability of logistics operations while identifying opportunities for improvement and strategic investment to meet evolving market demands and challenges.

A worked example – EcoFoods Inc.

For this example, let’s consider a fictional company, “EcoFoods Inc.,” which produces organic food products and distributes them to retailers and customers across the country.

1. Scope and Definition:

EcoFoods Inc. operates a complex downstream transportation and distribution network, involving the movement of perishable organic food products from its manufacturing plants to various distribution centers and ultimately to retail outlets and consumers.

2. Key Components:

a. Transportation Modes:

EcoFoods utilizes a combination of refrigerated trucks for land transportation, as well as partnerships with shipping companies for sea transportation of bulk goods. Additionally, it employs air freight for urgent deliveries of high-value or time-sensitive products.

b. Distribution Network:

The company operates multiple distribution centers strategically located across the country to ensure efficient coverage and timely delivery. These distribution centers are equipped with temperature-controlled storage facilities to maintain the freshness and quality of the organic products.

c. Warehousing:

EcoFoods’ warehousing operations focus on efficient inventory management to minimize storage costs and ensure optimal stock levels. It employs barcode scanning and RFID technology for accurate tracking of inventory movement within its warehouses.

d. Last-Mile Delivery:

The company collaborates with local courier services and offers direct-to-customer delivery options, especially for online orders. It leverages route optimization software to ensure cost-effective and timely last-mile deliveries.

3. Performance Metrics:

a. On-Time Delivery:

EcoFoods consistently achieves an on-time delivery rate of over 95%, ensuring reliability for its retail partners and customers.

b. Transit Time:

The average transit time for products from manufacturing to retail shelves is maintained within industry standards, with continuous efforts to optimize routes and minimize lead times.

c. Cost per Unit:

The company closely monitors the cost per unit transported, including transportation, warehousing, and handling expenses, to ensure competitiveness while maintaining profitability.

d. Inventory Turnover:

EcoFoods maintains a healthy inventory turnover ratio by closely managing stock levels and implementing just-in-time inventory practices to minimize carrying costs.

4. Challenges and Opportunities:

a. Infrastructure:

EcoFoods faces challenges related to infrastructure constraints, particularly road congestion during peak hours and limited capacity at certain ports. The company explores alternative transportation routes and invests in infrastructure improvements where feasible.

b. Sustainability:

Recognizing the importance of sustainability, EcoFoods invests in hybrid and electric vehicles for its transportation fleet and implements packaging innovations to reduce environmental impact.

c. Technology Integration:

The company continuously invests in transportation management systems (TMS) and warehouse management systems (WMS) to optimize logistics operations and enhance visibility across the supply chain.

5. Regulatory and Compliance:

EcoFoods ensures compliance with food safety regulations, transportation safety standards, and environmental regulations governing its operations. It maintains robust procedures for quality control and traceability throughout the supply chain.

6. Strategic Recommendations:

a. Network Optimization:

Continuously assess and optimize the distribution network to minimize transportation costs and improve delivery efficiency, considering factors such as customer demand patterns and geographic distribution.

b. Technology Investment:

Further invest in advanced tracking and monitoring technologies to enhance real-time visibility into the supply chain, enabling proactive management of logistics operations and quicker response to disruptions.

c. Collaboration:

Strengthen partnerships with transportation providers, suppliers, and retailers to foster collaboration and streamline end-to-end supply chain processes.

7. Future Outlook:

a. Market Trends:

Anticipate and adapt to emerging market trends such as increasing demand for organic products, growth in e-commerce sales, and advancements in sustainable transportation technologies.

b. Resilience Planning:

Develop robust contingency plans to mitigate risks posed by potential disruptions, including natural disasters, geopolitical tensions, and supply chain disruptions.

By conducting comprehensive reporting and analysis across these key components, EcoFoods Inc. can effectively manage its downstream transportation and distribution operations, ensuring reliable and sustainable delivery of organic food products to its customers nationwide.

 

This category also includes emissions from retail and storage. Outbound transportation and distribution services that are purchased by the reporting company are excluded from category 9 and included in category 4 (Upstream transportation and distribution) because the reporting company purchases the service. Category 9 includes only emissions from transportation and distribution of products after the point of sale. See table 5.7 in the Scope 3 Standard for guidance in accounting for emissions from transportation and distribution in the value chain.

Emissions from downstream transportation and distribution can arise from transportation/storage of sold products in vehicles/facilities not owned by the reporting company. For example:

  • Warehouses and distribution centers
  • Retail facilities
  • Air transport
  • Rail transport
  • Road transport
  • Marine transport.

In this category, companies may include emissions from customers traveling to and from retail stores, which can be significant for companies that own or operate retail facilities. See chapter 5.6 of the Scope 3 Standard for guidance on the applicability of category 9 to final products and intermediate products sold by the reporting company. A reporting company’s scope 3 emissions from downstream transportation and distribution include the scope 1 and scope 2 emissions of transportation companies, distribution companies, retailers, and (optionally) customers.

If the reporting company sells an intermediate product, the company should report emissions from transportation and distribution of this intermediate product between the point of sale by the reporting company and either (1) the end consumer (if the eventual end use of the intermediate product is known) or (2) business customers (if the eventual end use of the intermediate product is unknown).

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Category 12 End-of-Life Treatment of Sold Products – Best read

Category 12 End-of-Life Treatment of Sold Products

Category description – Category 12 End-of-Life Treatment of Sold Products includes emissions from the waste disposal and treatment of products sold by the reporting company (in the reporting year) at the end of their life. This category includes the total expected end-of-life emissions from all products sold in the reporting year.

(See section 5.4 of the Scope 3 Standard for more information on the time boundary of scope 3 categories.)

End-of-life treatment methods (e.g., landfilling, incineration, and recycling) are described in category 5 (Waste generated in operations) and apply to both category 5 and category 12. Calculating emissions from category 12 requires assumptions about the end-of-life treatment methods used by consumers. Companies are required to report a description of the methodologies and assumptions used to calculate emissions (see chapter 11 of the Scope 3 Standard).

For sold intermediate products, companies should account for the emissions from disposing of the intermediate product at the end of its life, not the final product.

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IFRS 15 Retail – the finest perfect examples

IFRS 15 Retail revenue – finest perfect examples

Retail is the process of selling consumer goods or services to customers through multiple channels of distribution to earn a profit. Retailers satisfy demand identified through a supply chain. The term “retailer” is typically applied where a service provider fills the small orders of many individuals, who are end-users, rather than large orders of a small number of wholesale, corporate or government clientele. (Source: Wikipedia)

So what is the IFRS 15 guidance for retail?

Here are the cases covering the most significant accounting topics for retail in IFRS 15.


Case – Customer incentives Buy three, get coupon for one free

Death By Chocolate Ltd, a high street chain, is offering a promotion whereby a customer who purchases three boxes of chocolates at €20 per box in a single transaction in a store receives an offer for one free box of chocolates if the customer fills out a request form and mails it to them before a set expiration date.

Death By Chocolate estimates, based on recent experience with similar promotions, that 80% of the customers will complete the mail in rebate required to receive the free box of chocolates.

How is a ‘buy three, get one free’ transaction accounted for and presented by Death By Chocolate?

The rules

IFRS 15.22 states: “At contract inception, an entity shall assess the goods or services promised in a contract with a customer and shall identify as a performance obligation each promise to transfer to the customer either:IFRS 15 Retail

  1. a good or service (or a bundle of goods or services) that is distinct; or
  2. a series of distinct goods or services that are substantially the same and that have the same pattern of transfer to the customer (see paragraph 23).”

IFRS 15.26 provides examples of distinct goods and services, including “granting options to purchase additional goods or services (when those options provide a customer with a material right, as described in paragraphs B39-B43)”.

IFRS 15.B40: “If , in a contract, an entity grants a customer the option to acquire additional goods or services, that option gives rise to a performance obligation in the contract only if the option provides a material right to the customer that it would not receive without entering into that contract (for example, a discount that is incremental to the range of discounts typically given for those goods or services to that class of customer in that geographical area or market).

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Startup valuation

Startup valuation

If every business starts with an idea, young companies can range the spectrum. Some are unformed, at least in a commercial sense, where the owner of the business has an idea that he or she thinks can fill an unfilled need among consumers.

Others have inched a little further up the scale and have converted the idea into a commercial product, albeit with little to show in terms of revenues or earnings. Still others have moved even further down the road to commercial success, and have a market for their product or service, with revenues and the potential, at least, for some profits.

Startup valuationSince young companies tend to be small, they represent only a small part of the overall economy. However, they tend to have a disproportionately large impact on the economy for several reasons.

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Excellent Study IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

the insured items of business risk exposures

Although the popular definition of hedging is an investment taken out to limit the risk of another investment, insurance is an example of a real-world hedge.

Every entity is exposed to business risks from its daily operations. Many of those risks have an impact on the cash flows or the value of assets and liabilities, and therefore, ultimately affect profit or loss. In order to manage these risk exposures, companies often enter into derivative contracts (or, less commonly, other financial instruments) to hedge them. Hedging can, therefore, be seen as a risk management activity in order to change an entity’s risk profile.

The idea of hedge accounting is to reduce (insure) this mismatch by changing either the measurement or (in the case of certain firm commitments) FRS 9 Eligible Hedged itemsrecognition of the hedged exposure, or the accounting for the hedging instrument.

The definition of a Hedged item

A hedged item is an asset, liability, firm commitment, highly probable forecast transaction or net investment in a foreign operation that

  1. exposes the entity to risk of changes in fair value or future cash flows and
  2. is designated as being hedged

The hedge item can be:

Only assets, liabilities, firm commitments and forecast transactions with an external party qualify for hedge accounting. As an exception, a hedge of the foreign currency risk of an intragroup monetary item qualifies for hedge accounting if that foreign currency risk affects consolidated profit or loss. In addition, the foreign currency risk of a highly probable forecast intragroup transaction would also qualify as a hedged item if that transaction affects consolidated profit or loss. These requirements are unchanged from IAS 39.

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Focus on IFRS 16 Leases – Best read

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases

 

Best focus on IFRS 16 Leases Best focus on IFRS 16 Leases

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases 2

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases 3

(Source https://www.bdo.global/en-gb/services/audit-assurance/ifrs/ifrs-at-a-glance)

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases or in slightly more detail…..

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Beware of COVID 19 Rent concessions IFRS accounting

Beware of COVID 19 Rent concessions IFRS accounting

IFRS 16 amendments Corona Rent concessions provide relief to lessees in accounting for rent concessions.

IFRS 16 Rent concession amendments in a nutshell

The lessee perspective

The amendments to IFRS 16 add an optional practical expedient that allows lessees to bypass assessing whether a rent concession that meets the following criteria is a lease modification:

  • it is a direct consequence of COVID-19; Beware of COVID 19 Rent concessions IFRS accounting
  • the revised lease consideration is substantially the same as, or less than, the original lease consideration;
  • any reduction in the lease payments applies to payments originally due on or before June 30, 2021; and
  • there is no substantive change to the other terms and conditions of the lease.

Lessees who elect this practical expedient account for qualifying rent concessions in the same way as changes under IFRS 16 that are not lease modifications. The accounting will depend on the nature of the concession, but one outcome might be to recognize negative variable lease payments in the period in which the lessor agrees to an unconditional forgiveness of lease payments.

Lessees are required to apply the practical expedient consistently to similar leases and similar concessions. They must also disclose if they elected the practical expedient and for which concessions, as well as the amount recognized in profit and loss in the reporting period to reflect changes in lease payments that arise from rent concessions to which they have applied the practical expedient.

The amendments are effective for reporting periods beginning after June 1, 2020, with early application permitted.

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Right of return – How 2 best account it

Right of return – IFRS 15 notes that, in some contracts, an entity may transfer control of a product to a customer, but grant the customer the right to return. In return, the customer may receive a full or partial refund of any consideration paid; a credit that can be applied against amounts owed, or that will be owed, to the entity; another product in exchange; or any combination thereof [IFRS15 B20]. IFRS 15 B22 states that a right of return does not represent a separate performance obligation. Instead, a right of return affects the transaction price and the amount of revenue an entity can recognise for satisfied performance obligations. In other words, rights of return create variability … Read more

Customer relationships Distributor Method

Customer relationships Distributor Method is a valuation model to determine the value of the existing customer relationships portfolio in a business combination