Excellent Study IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

the insured items of business risk exposures

Although the popular definition of hedging is an investment taken out to limit the risk of another investment, insurance is an example of a real-world hedge.

Every entity is exposed to business risks from its daily operations. Many of those risks have an impact on the cash flows or the value of assets and liabilities, and therefore, ultimately affect profit or loss. In order to manage these risk exposures, companies often enter into derivative contracts (or, less commonly, other financial instruments) to hedge them. Hedging can, therefore, be seen as a risk management activity in order to change an entity’s risk profile.

The idea of hedge accounting is to reduce (insure) this mismatch by changing either the measurement or (in the case of certain firm commitments) FRS 9 Eligible Hedged itemsrecognition of the hedged exposure, or the accounting for the hedging instrument.

The definition of a Hedged item

A hedged item is an asset, liability, firm commitment, highly probable forecast transaction or net investment in a foreign operation that

  1. exposes the entity to risk of changes in fair value or future cash flows and
  2. is designated as being hedged

The hedge item can be:

Only assets, liabilities, firm commitments and forecast transactions with an external party qualify for hedge accounting. As an exception, a hedge of the foreign currency risk of an intragroup monetary item qualifies for hedge accounting if that foreign currency risk affects consolidated profit or loss. In addition, the foreign currency risk of a highly probable forecast intragroup transaction would also qualify as a hedged item if that transaction affects consolidated profit or loss. These requirements are unchanged from IAS 39.

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Beware of COVID 19 Rent concessions IFRS accounting

Beware of COVID 19 Rent concessions IFRS accounting

IFRS 16 amendments Corona Rent concessions provide relief to lessees in accounting for rent concessions.

IFRS 16 Rent concession amendments in a nutshell

The lessee perspective

The amendments to IFRS 16 add an optional practical expedient that allows lessees to bypass assessing whether a rent concession that meets the following criteria is a lease modification:

  • it is a direct consequence of COVID-19; Beware of COVID 19 Rent concessions IFRS accounting
  • the revised lease consideration is substantially the same as, or less than, the original lease consideration;
  • any reduction in the lease payments applies to payments originally due on or before June 30, 2021; and
  • there is no substantive change to the other terms and conditions of the lease.

Lessees who elect this practical expedient account for qualifying rent concessions in the same way as changes under IFRS 16 that are not lease modifications. The accounting will depend on the nature of the concession, but one outcome might be to recognize negative variable lease payments in the period in which the lessor agrees to an unconditional forgiveness of lease payments.

Lessees are required to apply the practical expedient consistently to similar leases and similar concessions. They must also disclose if they elected the practical expedient and for which concessions, as well as the amount recognized in profit and loss in the reporting period to reflect changes in lease payments that arise from rent concessions to which they have applied the practical expedient.

The amendments are effective for reporting periods beginning after June 1, 2020, with early application permitted.

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Best focus on IFRS 16 Leases

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases

 

Best focus on IFRS 16 LeasesBest focus on IFRS 16 Leases

Source: BDO – IFRS at a glance

Focus on IFRS 16 Leases or in slightly more detail…..

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Right of return – IFRS 15 notes that, in some contracts, an entity may transfer control of a product to a customer, but grant the customer the right to return. In return, the customer may receive a full or partial refund of any consideration paid; a credit that can be applied against amounts owed, or that will be owed, to the entity; another product in exchange; or any combination thereof [IFRS15 B20]. IFRS 15 B22 states that a right of return does not represent a separate performance obligation. Instead, a right of return affects the transaction price and the amount of revenue an entity can recognise for satisfied performance obligations. In other words, rights of return create variability … Read more

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Customer relationships Distributor Method is a valuation model to determine the value of the existing customer relationships portfolio in a business combination

Leases capitalisation on the balance sheet

Summary Leases capitalisation on the balance sheet

IFRS 16 includes a single accounting model for all leases by lessees.

The main implications of the new standard on current practice for lessees include:

  • No more operating leases under IFRS 16 (subject to the exceptions described below)
  • All leases (subject to the exceptions described below) will be capitalised on the balance sheet by recognising a ‘right-of-use’ asset and a lease liability for the present value of the obligation
  • No rental expense! i.e. no more straight-line expenses for operating lease costs. All leases will incur a front-end loaded expense, comprising depreciation on the right-of-use asset, and interest on the lease liability
  • When initially measuring the right-of-use asset and a lease liability, non-cancellable lease
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When is an asset identified?

When is an asset identified is an important question in accounting for IFRS 16 Leases.

Even if an asset is specified, a customer does not have the right to use an identified asset if, at inception of the contract, a supplier has the substantive right to substitute the asset throughout the period of use (i.e., the total period of time that an asset is used to fulfil a contract with a customer, including the sum of any non-consecutive periods of time). When is an asset identified?

Substitution right

A substitution right is substantive if the supplier has the practical ability to substitute alternative assets throughout the period of use and the supplier would benefit economically from exercising its right to … Read more