1 Best Complete Read – Financial Instruments

Financial Instruments is a summary of the current (Financial Statements preparation for 2020 on wards) IFRS reporting requirements relating to the combination of IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation, IFRS 7 Financial instruments: Disclosure and IFRS 9 Financial Instruments, into one overall narrative.

IFRS standards for Financial Instruments have a complicated history. It was originally intended that IFRS 9 would replace IAS 39 in its entirety. However, in response to requests from interested parties that the accounting for financial instruments be improved quickly, the project to replace IAS 39 was divided into three main phases.

The three main phases of the project to replace IAS 39 were:

  1. Phase 1: classification and measurement of financial assets and financial liabilities.
  2. Phase
Read more

The best 1 in overview – IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

forward-looking information to recognise expected credit losses for all debt-type financial assets

 

Under IFRS 9 Impairment requirements, recognition of impairment no longer depends on a reporting entity first identifying a credit loss event.

IFRS 9 instead uses more forward-looking information to recognise expected credit losses for all debt-type financial assets that are not measured at fair value through profit or loss.

IFRS 9 requires an entity to recognise a loss allowance for expected credit losses on:

  • debt instruments measured at amortised cost
  • debt instruments measured at fair value through other comprehensive income
  • lease receivables
  • contract assets (as defined in IFRS 15 ‘Revenue from Contracts with Customers’)
  • loan commitments that are not measured at fair value through profit or loss
  • financial guarantee contracts (except those accounted for as insurance contracts).

IFRS 9 requires an expected loss allowance to be estimated for each of these types of asset or exposure. However, the Standard specifies three different approaches depending on the type of asset or exposure:

IFRS 9 Impairment requirements

* optional application to trade receivables and contract assets with a significant financing component, and to lease receivables

Read more

A closer look at IFRS 15 the new revenue model

A closer look at IFRS 15 the new revenue model – IFRS 15 establishes principles that an entity shall apply to report useful information to users of financial statements about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from a contract with a customer. A closer look at IFRS 15 the new revenue model

The revenue model applies to all contracts with customers except leases, insurance contracts, financial instruments, guarantees and certain non-monetary exchanges. The sale of non-monetary financial assets, such as property, plant and equipment, real estate or intangible assets will also be subject to some of the requirements of IFRS 15.

A contract with a customer may be partially within the scope of IFRS … Read more

Stand-alone selling price

The best evidence of standalone selling price is the price that the entity charges for the good or service in a separate transaction with a customer. However, in many cases goods or services are sold exclusively as a package with other goods or services rather than on an individual basis (e.g. nonrenewable customer support).

Accounting policy choices impairment of financial assets

Accounting policy choices impairment of financial assets describes the impairment models available for trade receivables and contract assets with or without a significant financing component and lease receivables.

The impairment decisions

For trade receivables and contract assets that do not contain a significant financing component, it is a requirement to recognise a lifetime expected loss allowance (i.e. an entity must always apply the ‘simplified approach’). For other trade receivables, other contract assets, operating lease receivables and finance lease receivables it is an accounting policy choice that can be separately applied for each type of asset (but which applies to all assets of a particular type).

Accounting policy choices impairment of financial assets

Link to ‘simplified approach‘ or ‘general approach

What is

Read more

Measurement of remaining coverage

Measurement of remaining coverage – An entity measures the liability for remaining coverage on initial recognition of a group of insurance contracts eligible for the premium allocation approach (PAA) that are not onerous, as follows (IFRS 17 55]:

  • The premium, if any, received at initial recognition
    Minus Measurement of remaining coverage
  • Any insurance acquisition cash flows at that date, unless the entity is eligible and chooses to recognise the payments as an expense (coverage period of a year or less)
    Plus or minus Measurement of remaining coverage
  • Any amount arising from the derecognition at that date, the asset or liability recognised for insurance acquisition cash flows that the entity pays or receives before the group of insurance contracts
Read more

Extra disclosures IFRS 15 contracts

Extra disclosures IFRS 15 contracts – This part relates to a complete explanation of IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers in respect of Engineering & Construction contracts, see Revenue from Engineering & Construction contracts.

Contract balances

The disclosures related to contract balances are extensive and intended to enable users to understand the relationship between the revenue recognised and changes in overall balances of total contract assets and liabilities in a particular reporting period. Extra disclosures IFRS 15 contracts Contract assets: An entity’s right to consideration in exchange for goods or services that the entity has transferred to a customer when that right is conditioned on something other than the passage of time (for example, the entity’s future performance),
Read more

1 Best Complete Read – Determine the transaction price

Determine the transaction price

This part relates to a complete explanation of IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with customers in respect of Engineering & Construction contracts, see Revenue from Engineering & Construction contracts. Determine the transaction price


The transaction price is the amount of consideration to which an entity expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties. This amount is meant to reflect the amount to which the entity has rights under the present contract, which may differ from the contractual price (e.g., if the entity intends to offer a price concession). The consideration promised in a contract may include fixed or variable amounts. … Read more

Example financing component in a contract

Example financing component in a contract- This is an example of the workings of IFRS 15 60 – 64.

A vendor enters into a contract with a customer to build and supply a new machine. Control over the completed machine will pass to the customer in two years’ time (the vendor’s performance obligation will be satisfied at a point in time). The contract contains two payment options. Either the customer can pay CU 5 million in two years’ time when it obtains control of the machine, or the customer can pay CU 4 million on inception of the contract.

The customer decides to pay CU 4 million on inception. Example financing component in a contractExample financing component in a contract

The vendor concludes that … Read more