IAS 16 Generation assets for Power and Utilities

Generation assets for Power and Utilities

– are often large and complex installations. They are expensive to construct, tend to be exposed to harsh operating conditions and require periodic replacement or repair. This environment leads to specific accounting issues.

1 Fixed assets and components

IFRS has a specific requirement for ‘component’ depreciation, as described in IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment. Each significant part of an item of property, plant and equipment is depreciated separately. Significant parts of an asset that have similar useful lives and patterns of consumption can be grouped together. This requirement can create complications for utility entities, because many assets include components with a shorter useful life than the asset as a whole.

Identifying components of an asset

Generation assets might comprise a significant number of components, many of which will have differing useful lives. The significant components of these types of assets must be separately identified. This can be a complex process, particularly on transition to IFRS, because the detailed record-keeping needed for componentisation might not have been required in order to comply with national generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). This can particularly be an issue for older power plants. However, some regulators require detailed asset records, which can be useful for IFRS component identification purposes.

An entity might look to its operating data if the necessary information for components is not readily identified by the accounting records. Some components can be identified by considering the routine shutdown or overhaul schedules for power stations and the associated replacement and maintenance routines. Consideration should also be given to those components that are prone to technological obsolescence, corrosion or wear and tear that is more severe than that of the other portions of the larger asset.

First-time IFRS adopters can benefit from an exemption under IFRS 1 First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards. This exemption allows entities to use a value that is not depreciated cost in accordance with IAS 16, and IAS 23 Borrowing Costs as deemed cost on transition to IFRS. It is not necessary to apply the exemption to all assets or to a group of assets.

Read more

IFRS 10 Special control approach

IFRS 10 Special control approach

– determines which entities are consolidated in a parent’s financial statements and therefore affects a group’s reported results, cash flows and financial position – and the activities that are ‘on’ and ‘off’ the group’s balance sheet. Under IFRS, this control assessment is accounted for in accordance with IFRS 10 ‘Consolidated financial statements’.

Some of the challenges of applying the IFRS 10 Special control approach include:

  • identifying the investee’s returns, which in turn involves identifying its assets and liabilities. This may appear straightforward but complications arise when the legal ownership of assets diverges from the accounting depiction (for example, in financial asset transfers that ‘fail’ de-recognition, and in finance leases). In general, the assessment of the investee’s assets and returns should be consistent with the accounting depiction in accordance with IFRS
  • it may not always be clear whether contracts and other arrangements between an investor and an investee
    • create rights or exposure to a variable return from the investee’s performance for the investor; or
    • transfer risk or variability from the investor to the investee IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the relevant activities of an SPE may not be obvious, especially when its activities have been narrowly specified in its purpose and design IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • the rights to direct those activities might also be difficult to identify, because for example, they arise only in particular circumstances or from contracts that are outside the legal boundary of the SPE (but closely related to its activities).

IFRS 10 Special control approach sets out requirements for how to apply the control principle in less straight forward circumstances, which are detailed below:  IFRS 10 Special control approach

  • when voting rights or similar rights give an investor power, including situations where the investor holds less than a majority of voting rights and in circumstances involving potential voting rights
  • when an investee is designed so that voting rights are not the dominant factor in deciding who controls the investee, such as when any voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and the relevant activities are directed by means of contractual arrangements IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • involving agency relationships IFRS 10 Special control approach
  • when the investor has control only over specified assets of an investee
  • franchises. IFRS 10 Special control approach

Read more

The Statement of Cash Flows

A Historical Perspective on the Statement of Cash Flows

In 1987, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an accounting standard, FASB Statement no. 95, requiring that the statement of cash flows be presented as one of the three primary financial statements. Previously, companies had been required to present a statement of changes in financial position, often called the funds statement. In 1971, APC Opinion no. 19 made the funds statement a required financial statement although many companies had begun reporting funds flow information several years earlier.

The funds statement provided useful information, but it had several limitations. First, APB Opinion no. 19 allowed considerable flexibility in how funds could be defined and how they were reported on the statement. Read more

Required Disclosure for error restatements

Required Disclosure for error restatementsRequired Disclosure for error restatements – If an error (either accidental or intentional in nature) is subsequently discovered that affected a prior period, the nature of the error, its effect on previously issued financial statements, and the effect of its adjustment on current period’s net income and EPS should be disclosed in the period in which the error is adjusted. In addition, any comparative financial statements provided must be adjusted. Required Disclosure for error restatements

In accounting for events after the reporting period errors easily occur because adjusting events are not properly recognised or the difference between adjusting events and non-adjusting events is not correctly made. Adjusting events are those providing evidence of conditions existing at the end of the Read more

What are related parties?

What are related parties – Related parties are relationships in which one party has the ability to control or significantly influence the economic and operating decisions of another. Transactions with related parties are a common feature of business. Typically related party relationships include the following:

  • Enterprises controlled or controlling one another, such as subsidiaries and joint venturesWhat are related parties
  • Individuals having an interest in the enterprise that gives them significant influence over the enterprise, such as majority owners
  • Key management personnel responsible for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the reporting enterprise, including close members of families of these individuals

Parties are considered related when one of the parties has control over the other or is able to exert considerable influenceRead more

Purchase price of PPE

Purchase price of PPE – Here is one complete case of the purchase price and other cost that may be capitalised when acquiring a non-current asset in the day-to-day business.

THE CASE Purchase price of property

Entity K purchased a plant for a gross price of CU 200 million. The Read more

Long-term supply contracts

Long-term supply contracts – To apply IFRS 15, automotive parts suppliers (APSs) will need to change the way they evaluate long-term supply contracts. APSs need to use significant judgement when they identify separate performance obligations (i.e., units of account), which may be different from those identified under IAS 18.

Tooling equipmentLong-term supply contracts

APSs commonly enter into long-term arrangements with Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to provide specific parts, such as seat belts or steering wheels. An arrangement typically includes the construction for the tooling, which is required to be used when manufacturing the parts to meet the OEM’s specifications. In many cases, the APS will construct and transfer the legal title for the tooling to the OEM after construction, even though they … Read more

Dealer sales vehicle incentives

Dealer sales vehicle incentives – Some automotive entities (including automotive parts suppliers (APSs) and original equipment manufacturers (original equipment manufacturers (OEM)s)) needed to change certain revenue recognition practices as a result of applying the revenue recognition standard, IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.  These standards superseded virtually all previous revenue recognition requirements in IFRS and US GAAP. Original equipment manufacturers need to use significant judgement when they identify separate performance obligations (i.e., units of account), which may be different from those identified under IAS 18.

original equipment manufacturers (OEM)s frequently offer sales incentives in contracts to sell vehicles to dealers. These sales incentives may include cash rebates, bonuses or other types of incentives made available to Read more

Construction contract – How 2 best account for it in IFRS 15

A construction contract is a contract specifically negotiated for the construction of (a combination of) assets that are closely interrelated in terms of design

Corporate asset-backed security – How 2 best account it in IFRS 9 IAS 32

Corporate asset-backed security includes ‘whole business’ securities based on the cash flows of an entire business unit, such as franchise or brand royalties.