IAS 36 Determine if and when to test for impairment

IAS 36 Determine if and when to test for impairment – When looking at the step-by-step IAS 36 impairment approach it comes down to the following broadly organised steps:

  • What?? – Determining the scope and structure of the impairment review (see the step-by-step IAS 36 impairment approach),
  • If and when? – Determining if and when a quantitative impairment test is necessary (discussed on this page),
  • How? – Understanding the mechanics of the impairment test and how to recognise or reverse any impairment loss, if necessary (see IAS 36 Impairment test – How?).

Step 3: IAS 36 Determine if and when to test for impairment

IAS 36 requires an entity to a perform a quantified … Read more

Property plant and equipment

Property plant and equipment are tangible items that are held for use in many different ways and are expected to be used during more than one period.

Other comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income comprises items of income and expense (including reclassification adjustments) that are not recognised in profit or loss as required or permitted by other IFRSs.

Reclassification adjustments

With an increase in the use of fair value measurement in the financial position, there was a need to separate realised gains and losses from unrealised gains and loss. Realised gains and losses (using accrual accounting) are include in profit or loss. Unrealised gains and losses in other comprehensive income.

First IFRS financial statements

The first annual financial statements in which an entity adopts International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs), by an explicit and unreserved statement of compliance with IFRSs. IFRS 1 sets out detailed rules that entities must follow when adopting IFRS for the first time. The standard also sets out a number of exemptions that may be applied when adopting IFRS. If an entity wishes to apply either of these exemptions a full audit trail must be produced to outline the assessment and sufficient evidence must be provided to evidence that the application of the exemption is appropriate.

Impairment of assets Highlights

Impairment of assets Highlights in IAS 36 applies to: Impairment of assets Highlights

The standard requires an entity to recognise impairment when its assets are carried at more than their recoverable amount. The standard prescribes procedures that an entity has to apply to ensure assets are carried at no more than their recoverable amount as illustrated here.

Impairment of assets Highlights

In terms of IAS 36 at the end of each reporting period, the reporting entity is required to assess whether there is … Read more

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI

Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI – IFRS 12 requires disclosures for each of an entity’s subsidiaries that have material non-controlling interests. Such disclosures assist users when estimating future profit or loss and cash flows (for example, by identifying the assets and liabilities that are held by subsidiaries, risk exposures of particular group entities, and those subsidiaries that have significant cash flows). The disclosures are as follows (new disclosures compared to the previous standard are in bold):

  • The subsidiary’s nameDisclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • Its principal place of business (and country of incorporation, if different)Disclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • The proportion of ownership interests held by non-controlling interestsDisclosures subsidiaries and NCI
  • The proportion of voting rights held by noncontrolling interests
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Where did Other Comprehensive Income come from?

Where did Other Comprehensive Income come from – Prior to 1997, other comprehensive income (OCI) and its components weren’t required to be reported anywhere in the financial statements, and many items bypassed the income statement and went directly to owners’ equity.

In June 1997, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 130, Reporting Comprehensive Income, established the requirement for reporting and displaying comprehensive income and its components as a required component of a full set of general-purpose financial statements.

SFAS 130 (codified as Accounting Standards Codification® Topic 220, Comprehensive Income) defines OCI as consisting of net income and ‘other comprehensive income’, which refers to revenues, expenses, gains, and losses that, under GAAP, are included in comprehensive income but excluded from … Read more

Presentation Insurance contracts

Presentation Insurance contracts Presentation Insurance contracts – IFRS 17 specifies minimum amounts of information that need to be presented on the face of the statement of financial position and statement of financial performance. These are supplemented by disclosures to explain the amounts recognized on the face of the primary financial statements (see ‘Disclosure of Insurance contracts’).

IFRS 17 requires separate presentation of amounts relating to insurance contracts issued and reinsurance contracts held in the primary statements. There is nothing to prevent an entity from providing further sub-analysis of the required line items (which may make the relationship of the reconciliations to the face of the statement of financial position more understandable).

Indeed, IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements requires presentation of additional line Read more

Accounting Policies to First IFRS Financial statements

Accounting Policies to First IFRS Financial statements – An entity must use the same accounting policies in its opening IFRS statement of financial position and throughout all periods presented in its first IFRS financial statements. Those accounting policies must comply with each IFRSs effective at the end of its first IFRS reporting period, unless there is a mandatory exception to retrospective application or an optional exemption from the requirements of IFRSs.

[IFRS 1, paras 7 – 9] Accounting Policies to First IFRS Financial statements

Note that:

  • An entity may apply a new IFRS that is not yet mandatory if that IFRSs permits early application.
  • The transitional provisions in IFRSs do not apply to a first-time adopter’s transition to IFRSs.

Mandatory Exceptions to Retrospective Application and Optional Exemptions Read more