Consolidated financial statements

IFRS 10 Definition of consolidated financial statements

The financial statements of a group in which the assets, liabilities, equity, income, expenses and cash flows of the parent and its subsidiaries are presented as those of a single economic entity.

ParentAn entity that controls one or more entities.

The other types of financial statements are unconsolidated financial statements (or company accounts) and combined financial statements.

Single economic entity concept

The concept of a single economic entity is illustrated in the example below:

Example – Single economic entity concept

A subsidiary buys an asset from a third party for CU 100. It subsequently sells the asset on to its parent for CU 130. The subsidiary records a profit

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US GAAP vs IFRS Consolidations at-a-glance

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US GAAP vs IFRS Consolidations at-a-glance – IFRS provides indicators of control, some of which individually determine the need to consolidate. However, where control is not apparent, consolidation is based on an overall assessment of all of the relevant facts, including the allocation of risks and benefits between the parties. The indicators provided under IFRS help the reporting entity in making that assessment. Consolidation in financial statements is required under IFRS when an entity is exposed to variable returns from another entity and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the other entity. US GAAP vs IFRS Consolidations at-a-glance

US GAAP has a two-tier consolidation model: one focused on voting rights (the voting … Read more

IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interest in Other Entities

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IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities is a consolidated disclosure standard requiring a wide range of disclosures about an entity’s interests in subsidiaries, joint arrangements, associates and unconsolidated ‘structured entities’. Disclosures are presented as a series of objectives, with detailed guidance on satisfying those objectives.

An investment entity that prepares financial statements in which all of its subsidiaries are measured at fair value through profit or loss presents the disclosures relating to investment entities required by IFRS 12. [IFRS 12 6 b ii]

IFRS 12 requires disclosure of the significant judgments and assumptions that an entity has made in determining the nature of its interest in another entity or arrangement. It also Read more

So, what exactly is a joint venture?

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what exactly is a joint venture? – Joint ventures are economic arrangements between two or more parties where key strategic decisions are made unanimously by the entities (the “venturers”) that share control. Key strategic decisions would include decisions that significantly impact sales and purchases of goods and services; research and development of new products; acquisitions and disposals; and the funding structure of the venture.

Joint ventures may appear in incorporated or unincorporated form (i.e. a joint venture need not result in the creation of a separate legal entity). “Strategic alliances” in which companies agree to work together to promote each other’s products or services may also be considered joint ventures.

How are joint ventures classified and accounted

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IFRS 10 Structured vs non-structured entities

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IFRS 10 Structured vs non-structured entities is a distinction in use under IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements. Consolidation under IFRS 10 is based on what can be referred to as a ‘power-to-direct’ model. Although there is no distinction between different types of entities in determining whether one entity controls another, there is a ‘gating’ question in the analysis that distinguishes between entities for which: IFRS 10 Structured vs non-structured entities

  • voting rights are the dominant factor in assessing whether the investor has power over the investee – i.e. the investee is controlled by voting instruments; and
  • voting rights are not the dominant factor in assessing whether the investor has power over the investee – i.e.
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Separate financial statements

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Separate financial statements – IAS 27 shall be applied in accounting for investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates when an entity prepares separate financial statements.

The laws of some countries require companies to present separate financial statements prepared in accordance with local regulations, and those local regulations require the investments in subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures to be accounted for using equity method. However, under International Accounting Standard (“IAS”) 27, the investments in subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures in separate financial statements could only be accounted for at cost or in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standard (“IFRS”) 9. In order to tackle this issue, the International Accounting Standards Board has issued the amendments to IAS … Read more

Disclosures material joint ventures

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Disclosures material joint ventures – The disclosures may be aggregated for interests in similar entities, with the method of aggregation being disclosed (aggregation resembling/replacing consolidation). A quantitative and qualitative analysis, taking into account the different risk and return characteristics of each entity, is made in order to determine the aggregation level. IFRS 12 gives the following examples of aggregation levels: by nature of activities, by industry or by geography. [IFRS 12.4, B2–B6]

However, as a minimum, information is given separately for interests in subsidiaries, joint ventures, joint operations, associates and unconsolidated structured entities. [IFRS 12.B4–B6]

Note a) [IFRS 12 B14(a)]


IFRS 12 indicates that the amounts included in the summarised Read more

Investments material associates disclosures

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Investments material associates disclosuresInvestments material associates disclosures – The subject of investments material associates disclosures may be aggregated for interests in similar entities, with the method of aggregation being disclosed (aggregation being consolidation). A quantitative and qualitative analysis, taking into account the different risk and return characteristics of each entity, is made in order to determine the aggregation level. IFRS 12 gives the following examples of aggregation levels: by nature of activities, by industry or by geography. [IFRS 12.4, B2–B6]

However, as a minimum, information is given separately for interests in subsidiaries, joint ventures, joint operations, associates and unconsolidated structured entities. [IFRS 12.B4–B6]

IFRS 12 emphasises that it’s necessary for financial statement preparers to strike … Read more

Joint Arrangements

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IFRS 11 describes the accounting for joint arrangements. The investor will be required to either apply the equity method of accounting or recognize, on a line-by-line basis, its share of the underlying assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. The accounting treatment required will depend on the substance of the arrangement and the nature of the investor’s interest in it. The option to apply proportionate consolidation has been removed. IFRS 11 supersedes the requirements relating to joint ventures in IAS 31 and SIC 13.

A joint arrangement is an arrangement of which two or more parties have joint control and the following characteristics are present:

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Net investment hedge

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The net investment hedge is one of three hedges defined in IFRS 9, the others are the fair value hedge and the cash flow hedge.

Hedge accounting can bring a number of advantages over traditional accounting methods. The core benefit is that by addressing the timings mismatch associated with standard derivative accounting, hedge accounting removes temporary volatility from the P&L. As a result, the financial statements will better reflect the company’s true economic performance.

Reducing the volatility in earnings results in a number of additional benefits:

  • Enterprise value. Earnings volatility is negatively perceived by investors.
  • Creditworthiness. Predictability in future earnings is a positive factor in creditworthiness.
  • Risk management. Statements reflect better and
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