Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities

– provides a narrative providing guidance on users of financial statements’ needs to present financial disclosures in the notes to the financial statements grouped in more logical orders. But there is and never will be a one-size fits all.

Here it has been decided to separately disclose financial assets and liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities, because of the distinct different nature of these classes of assets and liabilities and the resulting different types of disclosures, risks and tabulations.

Disclosure financial assets and liabilities guidance

Disclosing financial assets and liabilities (financial instruments) in one note

Users of financial reports have indicated that they would like to be able to quickly access all of the information about the entity’s financial assets and liabilities in one location in the financial report. The notes are therefore structured such that financial items and non-financial items are discussed separately. However, this is not a mandatory requirement in the accounting standards.

Accounting policies, estimates and judgements

For readers of Financial Statements it is helpful if information about accounting policies that are specific to the entityDisclosure financial assets and liabilitiesand about significant estimates and judgements is disclosed with the relevant line items, rather than in separate notes. However, this format is also not mandatory. For general commentary regarding the disclosures of accounting policies refer to note 25. Commentary about the disclosure of significant estimates and judgements is provided in note 11.

Scope of accounting standard for disclosure of financial instruments

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IFRS 7 does not apply to the following items as they are not financial instruments as defined in paragraph 11 of IAS 32:

  1. prepayments made (right to receive future good or service, not cash or a financial asset)
  2. tax receivables and payables and similar items (statutory rights or obligations, not contractual), or
  3. contract liabilities (obligation to deliver good or service, not cash or financial asset).

While contract assets are also not financial assets, they are explicitly included in the scope of IFRS 7 for the purpose of the credit risk disclosures. Liabilities for sales returns and volume discounts (see note 7(f)) may be considered financial liabilities on the basis that they require payments to the customer. However, they should be excluded from financial liabilities if the arrangement is executory. the Reporting entity Plc determined this to be the case. [IFRS 7.5A]

Classification of preference shares

Preference shares must be analysed carefully to determine if they contain features that cause the instrument not to meet the definition of an equity instrument. If such shares meet the definition of equity, the entity may elect to carry them at FVOCI without recycling to profit or loss if not held for trading.

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Excellent Study IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

IFRS 9 Eligible Hedged items

the insured items of business risk exposures

Although the popular definition of hedging is an investment taken out to limit the risk of another investment, insurance is an example of a real-world hedge.

Every entity is exposed to business risks from its daily operations. Many of those risks have an impact on the cash flows or the value of assets and liabilities, and therefore, ultimately affect profit or loss. In order to manage these risk exposures, companies often enter into derivative contracts (or, less commonly, other financial instruments) to hedge them. Hedging can, therefore, be seen as a risk management activity in order to change an entity’s risk profile.

The idea of hedge accounting is to reduce (insure) this mismatch by changing either the measurement or (in the case of certain firm commitments) FRS 9 Eligible Hedged itemsrecognition of the hedged exposure, or the accounting for the hedging instrument.

The definition of a Hedged item

A hedged item is an asset, liability, firm commitment, highly probable forecast transaction or net investment in a foreign operation that

  1. exposes the entity to risk of changes in fair value or future cash flows and
  2. is designated as being hedged

The hedge item can be:

Only assets, liabilities, firm commitments and forecast transactions with an external party qualify for hedge accounting. As an exception, a hedge of the foreign currency risk of an intragroup monetary item qualifies for hedge accounting if that foreign currency risk affects consolidated profit or loss. In addition, the foreign currency risk of a highly probable forecast intragroup transaction would also qualify as a hedged item if that transaction affects consolidated profit or loss. These requirements are unchanged from IAS 39.

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IFRS vs US GAAP Financial assets

IFRS vs US GAAP Financial assets – Both the FASB and the IASB have finalized major projects in the area of financial instruments. With the publication of IFRS 9, Financial Instruments, in July 2014, the IASB completed its project to replace the classification and measurement, as well as the impairment guidance for financial instruments. In January 2016, the FASB issued its new recognition and measurement guidance – Accounting Standards Update 2016-01, Financial Instruments–Overall: Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, and in June 2016, the FASB issued its new impairment guidance – Accounting Standards Update 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326).

The new classification and measurement guidance was effective for both US GAAP and IFRS as of … Read more

What is a Business Model?

What is a Business Model? The business model test is about whether the asset is part of a group or portfolio that is being managed within a business model whose objective is to collect contractual cash flows from the non-equity financial asset (Amortised Cost), or to both collect contractual cash flows from the non-equity financial asset and sell the non-equity financial asset (FVOCI). Otherwise, the asset is measured at FVPL (see summary schedule below). What is a Business Model?

An entity’s business model for managing financial assets:

  • reflects how financial assets are managed to generate cash flows
  • is determined by the entity’s key management personnel
  • does not depend on management’s intentions for individual instruments but is based
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IFRS 9 The Business Model Test

IFRS 9 The Business Model Test is a necessary condition (see IFRS 9 Classification and Measurement of Financial Instruments) for classifying a loan or receivable at Amortized Cost or FVOCI. The test is about whether the asset is part of a group or portfolio that is being managed within a business model whose objective is to collect contractual cash flows from the non-equity financial asset (Amortized Cost), or to both collect contractual cash flows from the non-equity financial asset and sell the non-equity financial asset (FVOCI). Otherwise, the asset is measured at FVPL. The key elements of this test are listed below.

Observe: IFRS 9 recommends applying the Business Model test before applying the SPPI test because this

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Do the SPPI contractual cash flow characteristics test

Do the SPPI contractual cash flow characteristics test summarises the classification of financial assets. A typical example of an instrument where the contractual cash flows would not meet SPPI would be a debt instrument with an interest rate that is linked to the issuer’s share price. Similarly, a debt instrument with an equity conversion feature, under which the holder has an option to convert the debt instrument into a fixed number of the issuer’s equity shares on maturity, would not meet the SPPI test. Do the SPPI contractual cash flow characteristics test

However, if an issuer uses its own shares as a ‘currency’ to settle a convertible debt instrument, then this might meet the SPPI test. This could … Read more

Instruments that failed the SPPI test

Instruments that failed the SPPI test – The following financial instruments in IFRS 9 have be carefully judged by the IASB and fail(ed) the Solely Payment of Principal and Interest test.

[IFRS 9 B4.1.9D, IFRS 9 B4.1.14] Instruments that fail(ed) the SPPI test

Contract description

Considerations

A bond that is convertible into a fixed number of equity instruments of the issuer.

The SPPI test is not met because the return on the bond is not just consideration for the time value of money and credit risk, but also reflects the value of the issuer’s equity.

An inverse floating interest rate loan – e.g. the interest rate on the loan increases if an interest rate index decreases.

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Instruments that may fail the SPPI test

Instruments that may fail the SPPI test – Careful consideration and a documented decision regarding the Solely Payment of Principal and Interest test is needed in the following cases:Instruments that may fail the SPPI test

[IFRS 9 B4.1.13, IFRS 9 BC4.186, IFRS 9 BC4.190]

Instruments that may fail the SPPI test

Instruments that may fail the SPPI test

Instruments that may fail the SPPI test

Contract description

Considerations

A bond with a stated maturity and payments of principal and interest linked to an unleveraged inflation index of the currency in which the instrument is issued. The principal amount is protected. This linkage resets the time value of money to the current level.

Linking payments of principal and interest to an unleveraged inflation index resets

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Changes in contractual provisions

Changes in contractual provisions – How do you account for contractual provisions in a financial instruments contract that change the timing or amount of contractual cash flows?

Contractual cash flows of some financial assets may change over their lives. For example, an asset may have a floating interest rate. Also, in many cases an asset can be prepaid or its term extended. [IFRS 9 B4.1.10, IFRS 9 B4.1.12] Changes in contractual provisions

For such assets, an entity determines whether the contractual cash flows that could arise over the life of the instrument meet the SPPI criterion. It does so by assessing the contractual cash flows that could arise both before and after the change in contractual cash Read more